Thursday, February 14, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—February 14, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High (Staff Attorney)
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Food Labeling: Groups Sue Pilgrim's Pride Over Marketing and Advertising Claims  
On February 7, 2019, Food & Water Watch and the Organic Consumers Association announced that the organizations have filed a lawsuit in the D.C. Superior Court against Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation for alleged deceptive marketing and advertising practices.  According to the two organizations, Pilgrim’s Pride markets and advertises that its birds are fed “only natural ingredients,” are “treated humanely,” and that the company’s poultry products are “produced in an environmentally responsible way.” Food & Water Watch and the Organic Consumers Association assert, however, that these claims violate the Consumer Protection Procedures Act because Pilgrim’s Pride routinely uses antibiotics, synthetic chemical disinfectants, genetically modified crops, and growth promoting drugs. 

Food Labeling: Lawsuit Settled Regarding Missouri Meat Labeling Law
On February 12, 2019, the St. Louis Post Dispatch reported a settlement regarding a challenge to Missouri’s law restricting the labeling of “meat” products.  According to the report, under Missouri law, only products “derived from an actual cow, chicken, turkey or some other animal with two or four feet” may be marketed as meat.  As a result, the ACLU and the makers of plant-based meat products sued alleging that the law violated free speech rights under the First Amendment.  The report stated that the details of the settlement are still being processed and should be announced sometime in March.

WOTUS: EPA Announces Public Hearing for Proposed Revised Definition of WOTUS
The Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of the Army announced that on February 27 and February 28, 2019, the agencies will hold a public hearing regarding a proposed rule revising the definition of “waters of the United States.” The public meeting will be held in Kansas City, Kansas, and will provide the public the opportunity to present data, information, or views regarding the proposed rule.  The pre-publication version of the proposed rule can be found at https://www.epa.gov/wotus-rule/step-two-revise.  The comment period on the proposed rule will end 60 days after notice of the proposed rule is published in the Federal Register

Seed Law: Monsanto Wins Royalty Ruling Over Indian Seed Company
On February 11, 2019, Reuters reported that Bayer AG Monsanto has won an arbitration ruling involving a royalty dispute with Indian seed maker Nuziveedu Seeds Ltd (NSL).  According to Reuters, NSL had previously sold genetically modified cotton seeds under a license agreement with Mahyco Monsanto Biotech (MMB), a joint venture between Monsanto and India’s Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Co.  In 2015, however, NSL and its affiliates decided to stop paying royalties to MMB asserting that Monsanto’s genetically modified cotton seeds were not entitled to patent protection under India law.  Reuters stated that while the results of the arbitral award is confidential, Monsanto had previously calculated that NSL and its two affiliates owed about $22.82 million to MMB.

Raw Milk: CDC Links Brucellosis Exposure to Raw Milk from PA Farm
On February 8, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced possible Brucella strain RB51 (RB51) exposure due to the consumption of raw milk from a Pennsylvania dairy farm.  In November 2018, a New York resident, who drank raw milk purchased from Miller’s Biodiversity Farm in Quarryville, Pennsylvania, was diagnosed with brucellosis.  Subsequently, milk samples from Miller’s Biodiversity Farm tested positive for RB51.  According to CDC, as of January 22, 2019, investigators have determined that people in Alabama, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, and Virginia have bought or consumed raw milk from Miller’s Biodiversity Farm.  CDC stated that anyone who has consumed raw milk or raw milk products from Miller’s Biodiversity Farm since January 2016 may have been exposed to RB51 and should consult their doctor.  Additionally, CDC advised that any raw milk or raw milk products acquired from Miller’s Biodiversity Farm should be discarded.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“New Lake Erie lawsuit filed against U.S. EPA”, Evin Bachelor, Ohio Agricultural Law Blog, Ohio State University Extension (February 13, 2019)
“Swimming in Deep water with Government Sharks”, Patrick B. Dillon, Dillon Law P.C. Blog (January 22, 2019)
“Do Farmers Still Care About Ag Data Privacy?”, Todd Janzen, Janzen Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (January 21, 2019)  

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 256: Legislation expanding the use of mushroom compost (Referred to Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, February 7, 2019)
HB 441: Legislation to allow wind energy on farmland preservation (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, February 11, 2019)
HB 453: Legislation regulating the sale of certain expired foods, over the counter drugs, and cosmetics (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, February 11, 2019)
HB 404: Legislation designating “Tree of Heaven” a noxious weed (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, February 6, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Environmental Quality Board

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:
“The state of the USDA: A quiet dismantling” – Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter     
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—February 7, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High (Staff Attorney)
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Labeling Laws: Court Rejects San Francisco Law Requiring Health Warnings on Sugary Drinks
On January 31, 2019, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals determined that a San Francisco ordinance requiring health warnings on certain sugar-sweetened beverages violated the First Amendment right to freedom of speech (American Beverage Association v. City and County of San Francisco, Case: 16-16072).  In June 2015, San Francisco enacted an ordinance requiring that certain sugar-sweetened beverage advertisements be labeled with the following statement: “WARNING: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay. This is a message from the City and County of San Francisco.”  Under the ordinance, the warning was to occupy at least 20% of the advertisement.  The 9th Circuit stated that court findings suggested that the goals of the ordinance could be accomplished with a warning smaller than 20%.  As a result, the court ruled that “the 20% requirement is not justified and is unduly burdensome when balanced against its likely burden on protected speech.”

Cannabis / Industrial Hemp: Vote Hemp Releases 2018 Hemp Crop Report
On January 28, 2019, the hemp advocacy organization Vote Hemp announced the release of its 2018 U.S. Hemp Crop Report.  The report provides the number of acres of hemp grown in 2018 and identifies states that have enacted hemp legislation.  According to the report, the total number of acres of hemp grown in the U.S. increased from 25,713 in 2017 to 78,176 in 2018.  Additionally, the report stated that 41 states have currently enacted legislation regarding hemp production.

International Trade: USDA Awards $200M to Help Farmers Expand Markets
On January 31, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that the agency has awarded $200 million to 57 organizations through the Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP).  According to USDA, the purpose of the ATP is to help U.S. agricultural producers identify and gain access new export markets.  U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue stated that the funds are “seed money, leveraged by hundreds of millions of dollars from the private sector, that will help to increase our agricultural exports.”

Dairy Policy: California Milk Processor Board Announces Consumer Loyalty Program
On January 28, 2019, Cison PR Newswire reported that the California Milk Processor Board (CMPB) has launched a consumer loyalty program that will pay consumers for the purchase of real dairy milk.  The new program will be known as “Moo Money.” Under the program, which starts January 28, 2019 and ends April 28, 2019, eligible California consumers can earn points for every $1 spent towards a qualifying purchase of real dairy milk.  If these consumers accumulate enough points, they will have the ability to convert the points into Virtual Reward Cards which can then be used where ever MasterCard is accepted.  Previously, CMPB created the well-known “Got Milk?” dairy campaign.

Air Quality: Maryland to Monitor Air Near Poultry Houses
On January 29, 2019, the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) announced that it will collect air samples on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore in order to determine the effects of large poultry houses on air quality.  At various monitoring stations, measurements will be made regarding ammonia and particulate matter.  Information will also be collected regarding weather conditions.  The monitoring is scheduled for one year.  At the end of the that time, MDE will examine the collected information and determine any future necessary actions.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Agricultural Tenants and Eminent Domain Proceeds”, Tiffany Dowell Lashmet, Texas Agriculture Law Blog – Texas A&M AgriLife Extension (February 4, 2019)
“Maryland’s Laws for Raising Honey Bee”, Nicole Cook, Maryland Risk Management Education Blog (January 29, 2019)
“Ag-gag gets the bag”, Ellen Essman, Ag Law Blog – Agricultural Law & Taxation – Ohio State University Extension (January 29, 2019)  

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 85: Legislation regarding licensing fee exemptions for certain service dogs (Referred to Senate for consideration, February 4, 2019)
SB 145: Legislation amending the Agricultural Area Security Law to provide for restrictions and limitations on preserved farmland (Referred to Senate for consideration, February 4, 2019)
HB 368: Legislation regarding boarding kennel licensing (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee February 4, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Environmental Protection

Milk Marketing Board

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter     
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—January 31, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High (Staff Attorney)
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Dairy Policy: Study Provides Strategy for Dairy Industry Growth
On January 23, 2019, the International Dairy Foods Association announced the release of a new research study regarding future growth for the dairy industry.  Conducted by McKinsey & Company, the study called for domestic innovation, supply chain revisions, exports to foreign markets with dairy deficits, and direct investments in foreign markets with dairy deficits.  According to McKinsey & Company, while dairy companies are currently better positioned to address domestic issues, future growth depends on global expansion; particularly expansion into African and Asian markets.  

Agricultural Labor: OSHA Lessens Injury and Illness Reporting Requirements
On January 25, 2019, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published notice in the Federal Register of a final rule reducing workplace injury and illness tracking requirements for large businesses (84 FR 380).  Accordingly, establishments with 250 or more employees are no longer required to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses) and OSHA Form 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report) to OSHA.  Such establishments, however, are still required to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses).  The change is intended to protect sensitive worker information from the risk of potential public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act.

Pesticides: Judge Allows Evidence Alleging Monsanto Sought to Influence Glyphosate Studies
On January 28, 2019, Reuters reported that a U.S. district judge has permitted “controversial evidence” in three separate lawsuits alleging that the glyphosate-based Roundup weed killer causes cancer.  According to the report, U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria has ruled that the plaintiffs can introduce evidence alleging that Monsanto had attempted to “ghostwrite studies and influence the findings of scientists and regulators during the first phase of upcoming trials.” According to Reuters, of the currently 9,300 Roundup case nationwide, 620 are before judge Chhabria.

Invasive Species: Researchers Discover Breakthrough Regarding Mite Harming Honey Bee Population
On January 29, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) announced that researchers have discovered that previously held beliefs regarding a pest affecting the honey bee population were incorrect.  According to ARS, scientists have determined that the Varroa mite (Varroa destructor) feeds on the honey bee’s fat body tissue rather than on its “blood” (hemolymph) as previously believed.  ARS stated that this discovery provides “the first direct evidence that Varroa mites feed on adult bees, not just the larvae and pupae.” ARS believes that this finding will help in the development of more effective pesticides and other treatments used to combat the Varroa mite.

Biosecurity: USDA Confirms Virulent Newcastle Disease in Utah Poultry Flock
On January 18, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of backyard exhibition chickens in Utah.  According to APHIS, the outbreak is believed to be connected to a recent outbreak in Los Angeles County, California because three of the birds in the flock had recently been moved to Utah from Los Angeles County.  APHIS stated that virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern and that no human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“‘Ag Gag’ Litigation”, Tiffany Dowell Lashmet, Texas Agriculture Law Blog – Texas A&M AgriLife Extension (January 21, 2019)
“You Can't Make Everybody Happy All the Time: the Costco Chicken Story”,  Brianna J. Schroeder, Schroeder Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (January 21, 2019)
“Stay in Control: Good LLC Governance”, Cari Rincker, Rincker Law Blog – Rincker Law PLLC (January 25, 2019)

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 85: Legislation regarding licensing fee exemptions for certain service dogs (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee January 24, 2019)
HB 210: Legislation regarding pesticide labeling (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee January 28, 2019)
HB 238: Legislation regarding the adoption of research animals (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee January 28, 2019)  

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Agriculture

State Conservation Commission

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter     
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—January 24, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High (Staff Attorney)
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Industrial Hemp/Cannabis: Pennsylvania’s Re-Opens Industrial Hemp Program to Allow Commercial Growing Operations
On January 22, 2019, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) announced that the department is re-opening the commonwealth’s 2019 industrial hemp program so as to include applications for commercial growing operations.  The re-opening of the program follows the recent passage of the federal 2018 Farm Bill which, according to Pennsylvania Agricultural Secretary Russell Redding, includes “language removing industrial hemp from regulation under the Controlled Substances Act, and provid[es] for commercial production of industrial hemp.” Previously, industrial hemp growing permits were only available to institutions of higher education or to persons contracted with the department to grow industrial hemp for research purposes.  PDA also announced, that under the re-opened program, there will no longer be a cap on the number of applications accepted by the department for 2019.

Industrial Hemp/Cannabis: Senators Request Update from FDA over Hemp-Derived Products
On January 16, 2019, Oregon Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley sent a letter to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking that the agency update federal regulations governing the use of certain hemp-derived products.  According to the senators, the Hemp Farming Act, which passed as part of the 2018 Farm Bill, legalized the production and sale of industrial hemp and hemp derivatives such as hemp-derived cannabidiol.  The senators assert, however, that action is needed by FDA because current regulations still prohibit the sale of hemp-based products across state lines.

Agricultural Finance: USDA to Re-open FSA Offices During Government Shutdown
On January 22, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that despite the federal government shutdown, all Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices nationwide will re-open on January 24, 2019.  The services provided by FSA, however, will be limited to those determined “critical” by USDA.  According to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, “FSA provides vital support for farmers and ranchers and they count on those services being available.  We want to offer as much assistance as possible until the partial government shutdown is resolved.” Additionally, Secretary Perdue announced that the application deadline for farmers seeking payments under the Market Facilitation Program, as provided by the trade mitigation program, has been extended to February 14, 2019.  Previously, farmers had until January 15, 2019 to apply to USDA for payments to offset retaliatory tariffs imposed by foreign nations.

Organic Agriculture: Action Filed to Prohibit Labeling of Hydroponics as Organic
On January 16, 2019, the Center for Food Safety (CFS) announced that it had filed an action demanding that the U.S. Department of Agriculture prohibit the labeling of hydroponic products as organic.  According to CFS, because hydroponic agriculture is a food production method that does not use soil, it cannot comply with organic requirements regarding soil standards.  CFS stated that “Hydroponic production systems are fundamentally different from organic production systems as defined by federal law—they do not promote soil health or conserve biodiversity.” CFS asserted that this failure to comply with soil requirements is a violation of the mandatory National Organic Program standards.  

Food Policy: Canada Issues New Food Guidelines
On January 22, 2019, CBC reported that for the first time since 2007, the Canadian government has issued new food guidelines.  According to the report, Canada’s food guidelines, which are primarily taught in schools and promoted by health professionals, no longer focus on food groups and recommended servings.  Instead, an emphasis is placed on eating fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and plant-based proteins.  Additionally, individuals are warned to limit processed foods and avoid sugars beverages.  Finally, the guidelines encourage healthy eating habits such as cooking more often and eating meals together.    

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Ohio Department of Agriculture: New Director Changes Course of Watersheds in Distress Rulemaking”, Evin Bachelor, Ohio Agricultural Law Blog, Ohio State University Extension (January 16, 2019)
“Trade”, John R. Block, Ag/FDA Blog – Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC (January 16, 2019)
“New Shutdown Contingency Plan Means Some IRS Services Resume”, Kristine A. Tidgren, The Ag Docket – Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (January 15, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Milk Marketing Board

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter     
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—January 17, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High (Staff Attorney)
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Ag-Gag Statutes: Court Strikes Down Iowa Law Criminalizing Undercover Investigations on Farms
On January 9, 2019, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Iowa struck down an Iowa law that blocked undercover investigations at farming operations (Animal Legal Defense Fund v. Reynolds, 4:17-cv-00362–JEG-HCA).  Under Iowa’s Agricultural production facility fraud law (Iowa Code § 717A.3A), any person that gains access to an agricultural production facility by false pretense could be convicted of a serious misdemeanor for a first offense or an aggravated misdemeanor for a second or subsequent offense.  The court determined that the Iowa law regulated speech protected under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.  According to the court, “[t]he right to make the kinds of false statements implicated by § 717A.3A—whether they be investigative deceptions or innocuous lies—is protected by our country’s guarantee of free speech and expression.”

Agricultural Labor: DOL Announces 2019 Adverse Effect Wage Rates for H-2A Workers
On December 26, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published notice in the Federal Register of the 2019 Adverse Effect Wage Rates (AEWR) for H-2A temporary nonimmigrant agricultural laborers (83 FR 66306).  The announced 2019 AWERs do not apply to agricultural labor or services involving the herding or production of livestock on the range.  AEWRs are published annually and are the minimum wage rates DOL has determined that must be offered and paid to both H-2A workers and workers in corresponding employment.  According to DOL, the purpose of AEWRs is to prevent the wages of similarly employed U.S. workers from being adversely affected.  Of note, the AEWR for Pennsylvania was increased from $12.05 in 2018 to $13.15 in 2019. 

Food Policy: SCOTUS to Decide if SNAP Redemption Data Should be Public
On January 11, 2019 the U.S. Supreme Court granted certiorari to determine if redemption data from the national Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) should be made available to the public (Food Marketing Institute v. Argus Leader Media, No. 18-481).  The case involves a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, filed by South Dakota newspaper Argus Leader, demanding that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) disclose redemption data from every store participating in SNAP between 2005 and 2010.  USDA has refused the request; stating that the data is “confidential” commercial information and exempt under FOIA.  According to USDA, if forced to disclose the information, thousands of food and grocery retailers will suffer irreparable harm.

Biotechnology: China Approves Five GM Crops
On January 7, 2019, Reuters reported that China has approved the importation of five genetically modified (GM) crops.  The approved products included DP4114 Qrome corn, DAS-44406-6 soybean (known as Enlist E3), RF3 canola, and MON 88302 canola.  Reuters stated, that previously, China had not approved the importation of any GM crops since July 2017 and had delayed the approval of MON 88302 canola for six years.  According to Reuters, a China representative of a U.S. agricultural industry association asserted that the approvals represented “a goodwill gesture” by the Chinese government aimed at resolving the trade issue.

International Trade: USDA Extends Deadline for Payments to Offset Losses Due to Tariffs
On January 8, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that the agency was extending the application deadline for farmers seeking payments under the Market Facilitation Program, as provided by the trade mitigation program.  Previously, farmers had until January 15, 2019 to apply to USDA for payments to offset retaliatory tariffs imposed by foreign nations.  Due to the lapse in funding caused by the partial government shutdown, however, USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) offices were closed at the end of business on December 28, 2018.  As a result, farmers have been unable to apply for program payments.  According to USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue, the application deadline will be extended “for a period of time equal to the number of business days FSA offices were closed, once the government shutdown ends.”

Pesticides: Arkansas State Plant Board Opens Public Comments on Dicamba Regulations
On January 7, 2019, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) announced a 30-day public comment period regarding the state’s proposed dicamba regulations.  Previously, on December 6, 2018, ASPB passed draft regulations to change Arkansas’ rules regarding the “over-the-top” application of dicamba for cotton and soybeans for the 2019 growing season.  The new rules would:
  • restrict applications of dicamba from May 21 to October 31;
  • require a one-mile buffer zone around research stations, organic crops, specialty crops, non-tolerant dicamba crops and other sensitive crops for applications taking place from April 16 to May 20; and
  • restrict the mixing of glyphosate with dicamba applications from April 16 to May 20

Following the a 30-day public comment period, ASPB will vote to approve this revised regulations.  Public comments can be submitted online or mailed to the following address:

Arkansas State Plant Board
Attn: Pesticide Division
P.O. Box 1069
Little Rock, AR 72203

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Cabinet Luncheon”, John R. Block, Ag/FDA Blog – Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC (January 10, 2019)

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 29Legislation to establish the Pennsylvania Lost and Found Dog Registry (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, January 11, 2019)

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter     
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food