Thursday, August 22, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—August 22, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Right to Farm Laws: Missouri CAFO Closes Following Nuisance Lawsuits
On August 19, 2019, Valley Oaks Steak Co. announced that the Missouri-based company was closing operations due to numerous lawsuits following a proposed expansion of a concentrated feeding operation (CAFO).  Previously, on July 30, 2019, the law firm of Humphrey, Farrington & McClain (HFM) announced that 141 property owners had filed suit in the Jackson County Circuit Court regarding a proposed CAFO expansion located in Lone Jack, Missouri.  According to HFM, the CAFO—which is owned by Valley Oaks Steak Co.—has been in operation since 2016.  HMF stated that Valley Oaks Steak Co. was seeking to increase the CAFO’s annual average of 999 head of cattle to an annual average of up to 6,999 head of cattle.  HFM alleged that the 141 property owners were currently being affected by the CAFO’s odors and that an expansion of the operation would cause the nuisance to worsen.  HMF asserted that the 141 property owners were seeking “punitive damages and a jury trial.”  Additionally, Valley Oaks Steak Co. was engaged in separate litigation with Powell Gardens—a botanical garden located in Kansas City—which had received a temporary injunction in 2018 in Jackson County Circuit Court to prevent the CAFO expansion.  According to Powell Gardens, the proposed expansion would have caused “irreparable harm to its 970 acres of gardens and thousands of species of plants.”  Valley Oaks Steak Co. stated that while the company “looked forward to having our day in court,” economic factors prevented the company from continuing operations.

Organic Agriculture: Conspirators Sentenced for Organic Grain Fraud
On August 19, 2019, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that sentencing had been handed-out to four men previously convicted of conspiring to falsely sell nonorganic grain as organic.  According to DOJ, from 2010 to 2017, Randy Constant sold $142,433,475 of nonorganic grain as organic grain.  The grain in question was used primarily for animal feed.  The affected animals and their products were subsequently sold as organic products.  DOJ stated that Mr. Constant was sentenced to more than ten years in prison and ordered to forfeit $128,190,128 from the proceeds of the sales.  Additionally, three farmers that supplied Mr. Constant with the nonorganic grain were sentenced for their role in the scheme.  According to DOJ, Mike Potter was sentenced to 24 months imprisonment, James Brennan was sentenced to 20 months imprisonment, and Tom Brennan was sentenced to three months imprisonment.  Each of the three farmers was ordered to forfeit $1 million in proceeds from the fraudulent sales.

Animal Welfare: APHIS Announces Funds for Animal Disease Prevention and Management
On August 12, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) announced its intention for the use of animal health resources allocated under the 2018 Farm Bill.  First, resources will be used to create a National Animal Vaccine and Veterinary Countermeasures Bank.  This vaccine bank will allow USDA to stockpile animal vaccines to combat “high-impact foreign animal diseases.”  Second, resources will be used to create a National Animal Disease Preparedness and Response Program.  This program will permit APHIS to issue grants to stakeholders for projects designed to prevent pests and diseases from entering the U.S.  Finally, resources will be used to expand the existing National Animal Health Laboratory Network.  These additional funds are intended to facilitate the rapid detection of foreign animal pests and diseases. 

Crop Insurance: USDA to Defer Accrual of Interest for Crop Insurance Premiums
On August 15, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Risk Management Agency (RMA) announced the deferral of the accrual of interest on spring 2019 crop insurance premiums.  According to the announcement, “USDA will defer the accrual of interest on spring 2019 crop year insurance premiums to the earlier of the applicable termination date or for two months, until November 30, for all policies with a premium billing date of August 15, 2019. For any premium that is not paid by one of those new deadlines, interest will accrue consistent with the terms of the policy.”  RMA stated that the change is intended to help farmers and ranchers who have experienced crop difficulties due to flooding and excessive moisture.  According to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, “USDA recognizes that farmers and ranchers have been severely affected by the extreme weather challenges this year…To help ease the burden on these folks, we are continuing to extend flexibility for producers with today’s announcement.”

International Trade: Canada to Provide $1.75B to Dairy Farmers Affected by Trade
On August 16, 2019, Canadian Agriculture Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau announced that over the next eight years, Canadian dairy farmers will receive $1.75 billion in federal compensation.  The move is designed to help the nation’s dairy farmers affect by the recently ratified Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.  Under the announced compensation, “$345 million will be paid in the first year, in the form of direct payments and will benefit all dairy producers in proportion to their quota held.”  Minister Bibeau stated, “Today’s announcement shows how much our government respects our producers and believes in the supply management system. As promised, the compensation is deployed fully and fairly to allow everyone to make the best decisions based on the new market realities and their respective situation.”

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Congress Passes Bill to Increase Chapter 12 Debt Limit”, Kristine A. Tidgren, The Ag Docket – Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (August 1, 2019)   
“Regenerative Agriculture and Livestock”,  Brianna J. Schroeder, Schroeder Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (July 26, 2019)
 
Federal Actions and Notices:
Rural Housing Service

Pennsylvania Case Law:
Com. of PA v. J. Bucher - 641 C.D. 2018: Court overturned conviction that Defendant was harboring dangerous dog—evidence did not support that dog had propensity to attack without provocation.

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 827: Legislation regarding municipal authority to regulate the time, manner and location of consumer fireworks (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, August 15, 2019)
HB 1744: Legislation regarding the regulation of lemonade stands run by minors on private property (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, August 16, 2019)
HB 1755: Legislation regarding State Conservation Commission reporting (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, August 16, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
The General Assembly

Department of Environmental Protection

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—August 15, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Pesticides: EPA Will Not Approve Labels Asserting that Glyphosate Causes Cancer
On August 8, 2019, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a press release
stating that the agency “will no longer approve product labels claiming glyphosate is known to cause cancer.”  According to EPA, such claims are false and as such do “not meet the labeling requirements of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act.”  EPA’s statement is a direct reaction to California’s Proposition 65 which requires an established list of chemicals determined by the state to “cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm.”  If a chemical is on the list, warning labels must be placed on any item that would pose consumers “significant exposure” to the chemical.  Currently, California lists glyphosate on the Proposition 65 list.  According to EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler, “It is irresponsible to require labels on products that are inaccurate when EPA knows the product does not pose a cancer risk. We will not allow California’s flawed program to dictate federal policy.”

Agricultural Finance: Legislation to Permit More Chapter 12 Bankruptcies Moves to President
On August 13, 2019, legislation was presented to President Donald Trump to increase the Chapter 12 Bankruptcy operation debt cap limit from $3,237,000 to $10,000,000 (H.R. 2336 (116)).  Under Chapter 12, qualifying “family farmers” experiencing financial difficulties are provided with the ability to establish plans to repay parts or all of their debts.  Through increasing the debt cap limit, the proposed legislation, known as the Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019, would allow more farmers to qualify for Chapter 12 Bankruptcy.  Previously, the legislation was passed in the U.S. Senate by voice vote on August 1, 2019.  Prior to that, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the legislation by voice vote on July 25, 2019.

Animal Welfare: Oregon Governor Signs Cage-Free Egg Law
On August 9, 2019, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed legislation requiring that by 2024, commercial operations with egg-laying hen flocks greater than 3,000 must house the flocks in “cage-free housing systems” (SB1019).  Under the legislation, the egg-laying hens must have the ability to roam and have access to “scratch areas, perches, nest boxes and dust bathing areas.”  Additionally, the legislation states that individuals are not permitted to buy, sell, transport in intrastate commerce, or receive eggs that are not produced in compliance with the Oregon’s egg-laying hen housing requirements.

Food Safety: FDA Seeks Comment on New Animal Drugs
On August 9, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published notice in the Federal Register seeking “comments on transit times to slaughter, milking frequency, and how end users interpret zero-day withdrawal period or zero-day milk discard time statements found on new animal drug labeling” (84 FR 39340).  According to FDA, new animal drugs used in food-producing animals are assigned periods of time between when the drug is last administered and when a slaughtered animal—or its milk—can safely be consumed by humans.  To better understand current industry practices regarding the assignment of these periods, FDA is seeking public comment regarding:
  • Current transit times to slaughter facilities;
  • Current holding times at slaughter facilities prior to slaughter;
  • Milking frequency at commercial dairy operations; and
  • How “zero-day withdrawal period” or “zero-day milk discard time” animal drug labels are interpreted by end-users.

 Comments must be received by October 8, 2019.

Pesticides: Groups File Petition Regarding Chlorpyrifos
On August 7, 2019, the public interest environmental law organization Earth Justice filed a petition for review with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit regarding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) decision to not ban the pesticide chlorpyrifos.  Previously, on May 29, 2017, EPA issued a Petition Denial Order entitled “Chlorpyrifos; Order Denying PANNA and NRDC’s Petition to Revoke Tolerances” (82 FR 64).  Subsequently, on July 18, 2019, EPA issued an Objections Denial Order entitled “Chlorpyrifos; Final Order Denying Objections to March 2017 Petition Denial Order” 84 FR 35555).  Earth Justice, on behalf of 11 petitioners, seeks a review of both the Petition Denial Order and the Objections Denial Order by the court.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“EPA decides not to ban chlorpyrifos-now what”, Sarah Everhart, Maryland Risk Management Education Blog (August 13, 2019)
“Who Should Control the Carbon Farming Marketplace?”, Todd Janzen, Janzen Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (August 7, 2019)     
 
Federal Actions and Notices:
Agricultural Marketing Service

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Environmental Protection Agency

Food and Nutrition Service

Foreign Agricultural Service

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SR 190: Resolution directing the Joint State Government Commission to study food waste in Pennsylvania and report findings to the Senate (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, August 7, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Environmental Protection

Environmental Hearing Board

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—August 8, 2019


Written by:
M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
Audry Thompson—Research Assistant
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Pesticides: California Couple Agrees to Reduced Roundup Damage Award
On July 26, 2019, Plaintiffs Alva and Alberta Pilliod agreed to reduce a jury award from over $2 billion to over $86 million for alleged harm caused by Monsanto Company’s glyphosate-based weed killer Roundup (Pilliod, et al. v. Monsanto Company, et al. Case No RG17862702).  The Pilliods alleged that exposure to Roundup caused them both to develop non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.  On May 13, 2019, a California jury found that Monsanto Company’s actions regarding its product Roundup entitled Mr. Pilliod to over $37 million for economic and noneconomic loss and $1 billion in punitive damages.  The same jury also determined that Mrs. Pilliod was entitled to over $18 million for economic and noneconomic loss and $1 billion in punitive damages.  On July 19, 2019, the judge in the case—Winifred Y. Smith—issued an order granting Monsanto Company a new trial unless the Pilliods accepted the reduced damage award.  In reducing the award, Judge Smith stated that “[t]he ratio between the compensatory award and the punitive awards were excessive” and that “[t]he United States Supreme Court has held that ‘an award of more than four times the amount of compensatory damages might be close to the line of constitutional impropriety.’"     

Agricultural Labor: DOL and Guatemala Sign Agreement to Provide Safeguards for H-2A Workers
On July 30, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) signed an agreement with the nation of Guatemala seeking to enhance the H-2A nonimmigrant visa program by requiring certification that “labor recruiters are vetted and registered with their government.”  DOL stated that the agreement does not replace existing U.S. laws, but is intended to serve as a “complement” to those laws.  Accordingly, the agreement seeks to protect H-2A temporary workers from “criminal actors” and from being “charged excessive fees” in order to participate in the H-2A program.  Additionally, the agreement is intended to help U.S. employers know whether a foreign labor recruiter is operating in “compliance with U.S. and Guatemalan law.”  According to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, the agreement “will allow for greater cooperation and will safeguard against disturbances in the H-2A visa program by protecting workers from illegal recruitment activity, providing our farmers with a stable, legal workforce.”   

Industrial Hemp/Cannabis: Cornell University to House Industrial Hemp Seed Bank
On August 2, 2019, U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer announced that the nation’s only industrial hemp seed bank has been designated for location at Cornell University.  Known as the Industrial Hemp Germplasm Repository program, the seed bank is being “rebuilt” using $500,000 in federal funds allocated under 2019 Omnibus Spending Package for the purpose of “characterizing, maintaining and distributing seeds.”  According to Senator Schumer, a national industrial hemp seed bank has previously existed, but it was discontinued following the crop’s designation as a Schedule 1 controlled substance under the Controlled Substance Act of 1970 (the Act).  With the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, however, industrial hemp’s designation as a Schedule 1 controlled substance under the Act was removed.  As a result, the return of a national industrial hemp seed bank was permitted.

Industrial Hemp / Cannabis: Ohio Governor Signs Bill Legalizing Hemp
On July 30, 2019, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed into law legislation legalizing hemp in the state (Senate Bill 57).  According to the legislation, the director of agriculture is authorized to establish a program to license and regulate hemp cultivation and processing.  Among the several provisions, the legislation:
  • Defines “hemp” and “hemp product” and specifies that neither the terms “drug” nor “marihuana” include “hemp” or “hemp product;” 
  • Excludes tetrahydrocannabinols found in “hemp” and “hemp products” from the list of Schedule I controlled substances; 
  • Specifies that the state board of pharmacy may not adopt rules including “hemp” or a “hemp product” in a schedule as a controlled substance;
  • Specifies that “the addition of ‘hemp’ or a ‘hemp product’ to any other product does not adulterate that other product;” 
  • Creates a hemp program fund to enforce the provisions of the bill; and
  • Establishes a hemp marketing program.

The legislation is “declared to be an emergency measure necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, and safety” due to the “[need] to advance and promote hemp and hemp products” to “achieve consistency and conformity with federal law regarding hemp.”  The legislation goes into effect immediately and requires the director of agriculture to submit a plan for the regulation of hemp cultivation to USDA within 180 days. 

Food Safety: FDA Approves Soy Leghemoglobin as a Color Additive
On August 1, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published notice in the Federal Register of a final rule amending the “Listing of Color Additives Exempt from Certification” (21 CFR part 73), “to provide for the safe use of soy leghemoglobin as a color additive in [uncooked] ground beef analogue products,” such as ‘veggie’ burgers (84 FR 37573).  According to FDA, the rule is in response to a color additive petition submitted in 2018 by Impossible Foods, Inc., which intends to expand its product line into direct-to-consumer uncooked “ground beef analogue products” that contain red-colored soy leghemoglobin.  The color additive petition process allows for a 30-day period upon publication of the final rule within which any person adversely affected may file objections.

International Trade: U.S. Announces EU Beef Deal 
On August 2, 2019, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced that an agreement has been reached with the European Union (EU) to expand imports of U.S. beef into the European market over the next seven years.  Currently, the U.S. exports approximately 13,000 metric tons of duty-free beef into the EU each year at a value of $150 million.  Under the new agreement, U.S. duty-free beef exports into the EU will initially increase to 18,500 metric tons annually at an approximate value of $220 million.  By year seven, exports of U.S. duty-free beef into the EU are scheduled to increase to 35,000 metric tons annually at an approximate value of $420 million.  Following the announcement, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue statedE.U. consumers desire high quality products, and I have no doubt that when given the opportunity to purchase U.S. products we will see more Europeans choose to buy American.”

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Where are my Syngenta settlement payments: Why have checks not been issued yet?”, Paul Goeringer, Maryland Risk Management Education Blog (July 30, 2019)
“Case watch: LEBOR and Lake Erie battles linger”, Ellen Essman, Ag Law Blog – Agricultural Law & Taxation – Ohio State University Extension (August 1, 2019)
 
Federal Actions and Notices:
Agricultural Marketing Service

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Commodity Credit Corporation

Environmental Protection Agency

Farm Credit Administration

Farm Service Agency

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Agriculture

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—August 1, 2019

Written by:
M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
Audry Thompson—Research Assistant
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Food Labeling: Plant-Based Food Company Brings Suit Challenging Arkansas Meat Labeling Law
On July 22, 2019, Tofurky Co., a producer of plant-based food products, brought suit in the Eastern District of Arkansas alleging that the Arkansas law prohibiting the labeling of plant or cell-based products as “meat” violates the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. (Tofurky v. Soman, No. 4:19-cv-514-KGB).  Under Arkansas Act 501, the term ‘meat’ is defined as "a portion of a livestock, poultry, or cervid carcass that is edible by humans.”  The law further states that the term “‘meat’ does not include a: (i) Synthetic product derived from a plant, insect, or other source; or (ii) Product grown in a laboratory from animal cells.”  Accordingly, food producers are prohibited from using the term “meat” on products that do not conform to the law’s definition of meat.  In similar fashion, Act 501 also prevents plant-based or cell-based producers from using “meat” related terms such as “bacon,” “beef,” “poultry,” “pork,” “ham,” or “sausage.”  In its complaint, Tofurky Co. asserted that Act 501 violates the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment by placing “a restriction on commercial speech that prevents companies from sharing truthful and non-misleading information about their products.” 

Agricultural Finance: U.S. House of Representatives Passes Legislation to Permit More Chapter 12 Bankruptcies
On July 25, 2019, the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation to increase the Chapter 12 Bankruptcy operation debt cap limit from $3,237,000 to $10,000,000 (H.R. 2336 (116)).  Under Chapter 12, qualifying “family farmers” experiencing financial difficulties are provided with the ability to establish plans to repay parts or all of their debts.  Through increasing the debt cap limit, the proposed legislation, known as the Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019, would allow more farmers to qualify for Chapter 12 Bankruptcy.

Agricultural Labor: Department of Labor Proposes Changes to H-2A Program
On July 26, 2019, U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published in the Federal Register a notice of a proposed rule to change the H-2A temporary agricultural labor certification program (84 FR 36168).  According to DOL, the proposed changes include the “streamlining” of the H-2A application process and a reduction in the regulatory burdens associated with participation in the program.  Interested individuals have until September 24, 2019, to submit comments on the proposed rule.  For more information regarding the proposed changes to the H-2A program, see the Penn State Agricultural Law Weekly Review dated July 18, 2019.

Biotechnology: APHIS Notes Closing of the Comment Period for GE Movement Regulations 
On July 25, 2019, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) issued an announcement reminding interested parties that the comment period for a “proposed rule titled ‘Movement of Certain Genetically Engineered Organisms’ will be closing August 6, 2019.”  Previously published in the Federal Register on June 6, 2019, the proposed rule revises regulations regarding the importation, interstate movement, and environmental release of certain genetically engineered organisms (84 FR 26514).  APHIS stated that the proposed revisions are in response to scientific advancements in genetic engineering and knowledge regarding plant pest risk.  Accordingly, the new revisions are designed to reduce regulatory burdens regarding organisms that are unlikely to pose plant pest risks.  According to APHIS, the proposed rule is "the first comprehensive revision of the regulations since they were established in 1987."

Biotechnology: Pioneer Seeks Deregulation of GE Corn Variety
On July 25, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published a notice in the Federal Register regarding a petition from Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. (Pioneer), to deregulate a genetically engineered (GE) corn variety (84 FR 35850).  According to APHIS, the GE corn variety, designated as DP202216, “has been genetically engineered for enhanced yield potential and resistance to glufosinate-ammonium herbicide.”  Interested individuals have until September 23, 2019, to submit comments regarding the potential deregulation of DP202216.

National Agricultural Policy: USDA Announces Details of Support Package for Farmers
On July 29, 2019, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) published notice in the Federal Register of fund availability for payments to producers under the Market Facilitation Program (MFP) (84 FR 36565).  MFP will provide payments for non-specialty crops planted by August 1, 2019.  The payments range from $15 to $150 per acre and are determined by a unified county rate based on the impact of foreign trade retaliation in that county.  Dairy producers in business as of June 1, 2019 will receive $0.20 per hundredweight of milk, and hog producers will receive $11 per head of live hogs.  Producers can sign up for MFP from July 29, 2019, through December 6, 2019, at their local FSA office.     

International Trade: USDA Awards Agricultural Trade Promotion Funding
On July 19, 2019, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue announced the allocation of $100 million from USDA to 48 organizations through the Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP).  ATP is a cost-share program available to all sectors of U.S. agriculture with demonstrable damages due to tariffs imposed on U.S. agricultural products in 2018-2019.  The program reimburses U.S. agricultural-related entities for approved foreign market promotion activities such as consumer advertising, public relations, participation in trade fairs and exhibits, market research, and technical assistance.  The 48 recipients are among the organizations that applied in 2018 for the $200 million of ATP funds awarded earlier this year. 

Urban Agriculture: Pennsylvania Governor Announces Grants Available for Urban Agriculture from PA Farm Bill
On July 26, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf announced the launch of the Urban Agriculture Infrastructure Grant Program, an initiative to provide $500,000 in grant funding to increase market opportunities for the commonwealth’s urban agriculturalists.  The program was created under Act 40 (SB 661) which was signed into law on July 1, 2019, as part of a package of bills designed to aid  Pennsylvania agriculture.  The program offers both “microgrants” of up to $2,500 that can be used for single applicants or one-time projects and “collaboration” grants of up to $50,000 to support community development and cooperative efforts to share resources.  Individuals and organizations can apply for the grants from August 1, 2019, through September 6, 2019.  

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Budget Deal”, John R. Block, Ag/FDA Blog – Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC (July 24, 2019)
“Will Carbon Farming Finally Show Us the Value of Ag Data?”, Todd Janzen, Janzen Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (July 19, 2019)  
 
Federal Actions and Notices:
Food and Drug Administration

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Agriculture

Milk Marketing Board

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities

Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food