Thursday, October 19, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—October 19, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

GIPSA: USDA Withdraws Proposed GIPSA Rule
On October 18, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) published notice in the Federal Register that the agency was withdrawing the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) rule proposed on December 20, 2016 (82 FR 48603).  According to the USDA, the proposed rule was intended to clarify unfair, unjust, or deceptive practices and to determine when such practices resulted in unfair advantages for packers, swine contractors, or live poultry dealers.  The USDA stated that as a result of withdrawing the proposed rule, the agency will continue the approach of determining “unfair and deceptive practices on a case-by-case basis.”

Immigration: DOJ and DOS Announce Partnership to Fight Visa Fraud
On October 11, 2017, the U.S. Departments of Justice (DOJ) and State (DOS) announced a formal partnership between the two agencies for the purpose of fighting employer visa fraud.  According to the announcement, the agreement provides for the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division and the DOS’s Bureau of Consular Affairs to share information on employers who may be “engaging in unlawful discrimination, committing fraud, or making other misrepresentations in their use of employment-based visas, such as H-1B, H-2A, and H-2B visas.” According to the DOJ, the goal of the partnership is to hold accountable those employers that discriminate against U.S. workers through the favoring of foreign visa workers.  

Pesticides: EPA Announces Label Changes for Dicamba Use
On October 13, 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that the agency has reached a voluntary agreement with Monsanto, BASF and DuPont to provide new label requirements for dicamba application to growing plants.  Known as "over the top" use, under the new requirements, labels will state: (1) application is permitted only by certified applicators, (2) farmers must maintain specific records, (3) application is limited wind speeds below 10 mph, (4) application is limited to certain times during the day, (5) tank clean-out language, and (6) language regarding enhanced susceptible crops and record keeping with sensitive crop registries.  The EPA stated that the manufacturers have agreed to have the new labeling ready for use in the 2018 season.

Chesapeake Bay: Pennsylvania Announces Hundreds of Farmers to Receive Reimbursement for Clean Water Plans
On October 13, 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) announced plans to reimburse a minimum of 800 Pennsylvania farmers for the cost of preparing agricultural plans for clean water.  According to the DEP, in an effort to help the Commonwealth meet the Environmental Protection Agency’s water pollution mandated targets for the Chesapeake Bay, state law requires that farmers implement one of the following: (1) a manure management plan, (2) a nutrient management plan, or (3) an agriculture erosion and sediment control plan.  Additionally, in certain circumstances, a farmer may be required to implement more than one of these plans.  Costs to prepare the various plans can range from $500 to $1,500 depending on the size of the farm.  The DEP asserted that while a minimum of 800 plans will be reimbursed, the department could potentially cover the costs of 2,200 plans.  The DEP stated that farmers are eligible for reimbursed for plans developed after January 1, 2017.

Soda Tax: Cook County Illinois Repeals Soda Tax
On October 11, 2017, the Chicago Sun Times reported that the Cook County Board of Commissioners voted 15-2 to repeal the county’s 1 cent an ounce tax on sweetened beverages.  Passed in November 2016, the sweetened beverage tax went into effect August 2, 2017.  According to the article, the elimination of the sweetened beverage tax will result in anticipated $200 million budget short-fall for the county, which includes the city of Chicago.

Pennsylvania Legislation
Pennsylvania Senate
  • HB 790  Controlled Plant and Noxious Weed Act (amended on third consideration by Senate, October 17, 2018)


Environmental Resources and Energy (S)
  • SB 799 Legislation to create a program for Pennsylvania municipalities and municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s) to meet their taxpayer funded Chesapeake Bay nutrient reduction mandates (reported for first consideration by Senate, October 17, 2017)


Agriculture and Rural Affairs (H) and Agriculture and Rural Affairs (S)
  • Joint informational meeting on Spotted Lanternfly (October 18, 2017)


Pennsylvania Actions and Notices
State Horse Racing Commission

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For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—October 12, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Labor: Agricultural Guestworker Legislation Delayed
On October 4, 2017, Brownfield Ag News reported that House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte’s (R-Va.) proposed Agricultural Guestworker Act has experienced a committee dely.  Introduced in the House on October 3, 2017, the offered legislation would create a new agricultural guestworker program for U.S. farmers and ranchers.  Prior to the delay, Chairman Goodlatte’s bill had been scheduled to go to the Judiciary Committee for markups on October 4, 2017.  No rescheduling of the legislation with the Judiciary Committee was announced.  

Labor: Pennsylvania Announces New Agricultural Apprenticeship Program
On October 10, 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) announced the creation an agricultural equipment service technician apprenticeship program.  According to PDA, the program will help students acquire “Jobs that Pay” through the development of “hands-on skills in science, technology, engineering, and math.”  Sponsored by the Northeast Equipment Dealers Association, the program is also intended to resolve anticipated workforce shortfalls resulting from the retirement of more than 1,000 of Pennsylvania’s agricultural equipment service technicians by 2027.    

Food Safety: San Francisco to Require Large Grocery Stores to Disclose Antibiotics in Meat
On October 3, 2017, the San Francisco Examiner reported that the San Francisco Board of Supervisors has approved an ordinance requiring that large grocery stores in the city submit annual reports detailing the use of antibiotics in raw meats and poultry products.  According to the ordinance, antimicrobial drugs found in meat and poultry pose an environmental and public health threat by allowing antibiotic-resistant bacteria to multiply and spread.  The ordinance seeks to reduce this threat by requiring grocery stores operating in the city, which also own or operate 25 or more grocery stores anywhere, to annually report antimicrobial information to the Department of the Environment (Department).  Upon receiving the annual reports, the Department will make public the information through publication on its website.

Labor: California Enacts Legislation to Limit Immigration Enforcement
On October 5, 2017, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law legislation preventing employers from allowing immigration enforcement agents onto the employer’s private business property without a judicial warrant.  Additionally, the law requires that upon receiving notice of an immigration agency inspection of employment records, employers have 72 hours to notify workers of the scheduled inspection.  Failure to follow the law could result in penalties ranging from $2,000 to $5,000 for a first violation and from $5,000 to $10,000 for each subsequent violation.

Conservation: USDA to Temporarily Suspend Acceptance of New Conservation Reserve Program Offers
On October 6, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that the agency will temporarily suspend the acceptance of new offers for land enrollment in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) until later in the 2018 fiscal year.  According to USDA, the reason for the temporary suspension of new offers is to avoid exceeding CRP’s 24 million acre statutory limit.  USDA did state, however, that except for offers made under the Pollinator Habitat Initiative, the agency will approval all eligible CRP continuous enrollment offers that were extended through Sept. 30, 2017. 

International Trade: USDA Withdraws Changes to Apple and Grape Exporter Reporting
On October 5, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service announced the agency was withdrawing proposed changes to the regulations governing how apple and grape exporters report certificate information.  According to the announcement, the proposed changes would have mandated that apple and grape exporters submit export certification information electronically into the U.S. Census Bureau’s Automated Export System.  Additionally, under the proposed changes, the regulations would have provided for a definition of the term “shipper” and transferred the certificate retention requirement from carriers to shippers.  According to USDA, the decision to withdrawal the proposed changes was based upon public comments received by the agency.
                 
Pennsylvania Legislation
Agricultural and Rural Affairs (S) and Agricultural and Rural Affairs (H)
  • Joint informational meeting to discuss the Spotted Lanternfly, a non-native species with the potential to greatly impact the grape, tree fruit, plant nursery, hops and logging industries; quarantines have been established in Berks, Bucks, Chester, Lehigh, Montgomery and Northampton Counties and there is growing concern regarding its spread (October 18, 2017, Hearing Room 1 North Office Bldg. 9:00 AM)

AgLaw HotLinks:


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Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.


For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—October 5, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
                 
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Labor: House Chairman Announces Bill to Create New Agricultural Guestworker Program
On October 2, 2017, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) announced legislation designed to create a new agricultural guestworker program for American farmers and ranchers.  Referred to as the Ag Act, Chairman Goodlatte’s bill would replace the current H-2A guestworker program with a new H-2C guestworker program.  According to the Chairman’s summary of the bill, the H-2C guestworker program would better meet producer needs by making available 500,000 visas each year for both seasonal and year-round agricultural work.   

Nutrition Labeling: FDA Seeks to Extend Compliance Dates for Nutrition Facts Labeling
On October 2, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published notice in the Federal Register proposing extensions to the compliance dates for the Nutrition Facts and Supplement Facts label final rule and the Serving Size final rule (82 FR 45753).  For manufactures with $10 million or more in annual food sales, the proposed delay would extend the compliance date from July 26, 2018, to January 1, 2020.  For manufactures with fewer than $10 million in annual food sales, the proposed delay would extend the compliance date from July 26, 2018 to January 1, 2021.

Clean Water Act: Tyson Pleads Guilty to Violating Clean Water Act
On September 27, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that Tyson Poultry Inc. (Tyson) has pleaded guilty to criminal charges for violating the Clean Water Act.  The DOJ stated that the charges stemmed from the release of the liquid food supplement “Alimet” at the company’s slaughter and processing facility in Monett, Missouri.  The DOJ asserted that the Alimet discharge caused the death of approximately 108,000 fish.  According to the DOJ, the plea agreement requires Tyson to pay a criminal fine of $2 million and serve two years of probation.

Horse Racing: PDA Addresses Recently Enacted Horse Racing Regulations
On September 26, 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) issued a press release regarding three recently enacted horse racing regulations addressing illegal performance enhancing drugs.  According to PDA, the regulations provide for increased penalties for repeat offenders, establish an out-of-competition testing program, and provide for horse ineligibility after a positive test.  PDA stated that with the enactment of the three regulations, significant consequences now exist for trainers, veterinarians and owners who choose to violate Pennsylvania’s horse racing laws.

Labor: Ben & Jerry’s Agrees to Improve Dairy Worker Conditions
On October 3, 2017, the New York Times reported that ice cream manufacturer Ben & Jerry’s has agreed to a program establishing labor standards for the Vermont dairy farms that supply the company with milk.  Entitled Milk With Dignity, the program mandates that dairy workers receive one day off a week and are paid at least the Vermont state minimum wage of $10.  According to the report, compliance with the program will be enforced through independent audits.

GMOs: Study Finds GM Soybean Oil Induces Less Obesity and Insulin Resistance
On October 2, 2017, Science Daily reported that a University of California, Riverside study found that the genetically modified (GM) soybean Plenish® induces less obesity and insulin resistance than conventional soybean oil.  Engineered to contain low levels of linoleic acid, Plenish® has a similar composition to olive oil.  While the study found less obesity and insulin resistance with Plenish®, the study did find that the GM soybean oil had the same effects on diabetes and fatty liver as those of conventional soybean oil.

Beef: BPI Establishes Fund for Workers Affected by “Pink Slime” Reporting
On September 28, 2017, Meat + Poultry reported that Beef Products Inc. (BPI) has established a $10 million fund to compensate workers that lost their jobs due to plant closures resulting from the negative reporting of BPI’s product Lean Finely Textured Beef.  According to the article, in 2012, ABC News published a series of reports that referred to BPI’s Lean Finely Textured Beef product as “pink slime”.  Subsequently, in 2012, BPI closed three production facilities and filed a defamation lawsuit against ABC News.  In June of 2017, the parties settled for an undisclosed amount.  The article stated that the fund will benefit 750 former workers.
                 
Pennsylvania Legislation
Environmental Resources and Energy (House)
  • HB 1486 legislation exempting “high tunnels” that meet certain parameters from any requirements under the Storm Water Act (reported out of committee, October 3, 2017)


Environmental Resources and Energy (Senate)
  • SB 917 legislation amending the Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act to expand the definition of “compost materials" to include “mushroom compost” (referred to committee, October 3, 2017)


Pennsylvania Actions and Notices
Department of Environmental Protection


Public Utility Commission


AgLaw HotLinks:


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Connect with us on Facebook! Every week we will post the CASL Ledger which details all our publications and activities from the week.

Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.


For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—September 28, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney

The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

GMOs: Syngenta Settles with Corn Farmers over Loss of Chinese Market
On September 26, 2017, Syngenta announced that a settlement had been reached with U.S. corn farmers “to resolve litigation concerning the launch of Syngenta’s Agrisure Viptera and Agrisure Duracade corn traits.” The litigation stemmed from allegations that Syngenta had introduced new genetic traits (commercially advertised as Viptera and Duracade) into the U.S. corn market before the genetically modified varieties had been approved by all major export markets.  Eventually, the traits were detected in U.S. corn imports to China and resulted in U.S. corn farmers being denied access to the Chinese market.  Though Syngenta did not disclose the financial terms of the settlement, Bloomberg News reported  that the total amount exceeded $1.4 billion.

Pesticides: EPA Intends to Permit Use of Dicamba in 2018
On September 20, 2017, Reuters reported that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) intends “to allow farmers to spray the controversial weed-killer dicamba next year, but with additional rules for its use.” According to the report, Reuben Baris, the acting chief of the herbicide branch of the EPA Office of Pesticide Programs, recently told state regulators that “the agency had not yet determined what steps it would take to mitigate problems associated with dicamba.” Reuters stated that “[t]he herbicide, which fights weeds resistant to another herbicide called glyphosate, was linked to widespread crop damage this summer.” Accordingly, some farmers have alleged that “the chemical caused damage by drifting away from where it was sprayed to fields of soybeans and other plants that could not tolerate it.”

Labor: Michigan Dairy Pleads Guilty to Hiring Undocumented Immigrants
On September 20, 2017, M Live reported that Michigan dairy farmer Denis Burke has pleaded guilty to federal charges of hiring undocumented immigrants. The report stated that “[b]etween February 2008 and May 2013, [Burke and his wife] hired and harbored more than 100 undocumented immigrants to work on their [two Michigan] farms.” According to the report, under the terms of the guilty plea, Burke faces a prison sentence of between 33 and 41 months and must pay a fine of $187,500.

SNAP: USDA Extends D-SNAP to Floridians Affected by Hurricane Irma
On September 22, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced that “Floridians struggling with the after effects of Hurricane Irma could be eligible for help buying food through USDA’s Disaster Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (D-SNAP).” According to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, “households who may not normally be eligible under regular SNAP rules may qualify for D-SNAP -- if their income is under the disaster limits and they have qualifying disaster-related expenses.” The announcement stated that “D-SNAP eligible households in the affected areas will receive two months of benefits, equivalent to the maximum amount of benefits normally issued to a SNAP household of their size.”

Antimicrobial: FDA Announces Public Meeting for National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System
On September 21, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published notice in the Federal Register announcing a public meeting entitled 2017 Scientific Meeting of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (82 FR 44189).  According to the notice, “[t]he purpose of the public meeting is to discuss the current status of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) and directions for the future.”  The announced meeting is scheduled to be held in Washington, DC on October 24 and 25, 2017.

Spotted Lanternfly: PDA Expands Spotted Lanternfly Quarantine
On September 22, 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) announced that the Commonwealth’s Spotted Lanternfly quarantine had been expanded to include 26 municipalities in Berks, Bucks, Chester, Lehigh, Montgomery and Northampton counties.  According to PDA, “[t]he quarantine was already in effect in other areas of the six counties.” PDA stated that the Spotted Lanternfly, which can be particularly destructive to the apple, grape and hardwood industries, “had not been found in the United States prior to its initial detection in Berks County in the fall of 2014.”
                 
Pennsylvania Legislation
Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committee (Senate)
  • Joint public hearing to discuss the Spotted Lanternfly (Hearing Room #1, North Office, October 18, 2017) 

Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committee (House)
  • Public hearing on HB 1463 - legislation which will increase dog license fees and authorize a Statewide online license registry (Room 205, Ryan Office, September 27, 2017)
  • Joint informational meeting on Spotted Lanternfly (Hearing Room #1, North Office, October 18, 2017) 

Environmental Resources and Energy (House)
  • HB 1818 Legislation providing for labeling, signage, and restrictions on sales and use of seeds/plants treated with neonicotinoid pesticides (Referred to committee September 25, 2017) 

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices
Department of Agriculture
Environmental Hearing Board
State Conservation Commission

AgLaw HotLinks:

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Connect with us on Facebook! Every week we will post the CASL Ledger which details all our publications and activities from the week.

Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.


For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—September 21, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney

The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:
                 
Ag-Gag: Tenth Circuit Rules Wyoming Resource Data Collection Law Violates First Amendment
On September 7, 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit ruled that Wyoming’s “statutes imposing civil and criminal liability on any person who ‘[c]rosses private land to access adjacent or proximate land where he collects resource data’” violate the First Amendment.  The court stated that under the Wyoming statutes, the phrase “collects resource data” is broadly defined so as to include numerous activities on public lands that “fit comfortably in the speech creation category recognized” by case law.  Accordingly, the court asserted that while “trespassing does not enjoy First Amendment protection, the statutes at issue target the ‘creation’ of speech by imposing heightened penalties on those that collect resource data.”  As a result, the court held “that the statutes regulate protected speech under the First Amendment and…are not shielded from constitutional scrutiny merely because they touch upon access to private property.”

FSMA: FDA announces that the FSMA produce Safety Rule is Now Final
On September 17, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that the FDA Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety rule is now final.  Initially proposed in 2013, FDA stated that “[t]he final rule is a combination of the original proposal and revisions outlined in the supplemental proposal (proposed in 2014), with additional changes as appropriate.” According to FDA, key requirement of the final rule include: (1) agricultural water; (2) biological soil amendments; (3) sprouts; (4) domesticated and wild animals; (5) worker training and health and hygiene; and (6) equipment, tools and buildings. 

FSMA: FDA Commissioner Announces Steps to Help States Implement Produce Safety Rule
On September 12, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb announced “a number of immediate next steps in a comprehensive approach to ensuring successful implementation of the Produce Safety Rule established by the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act.”  According to Commissioner Gottlieb, “the agency has recognized a need for additional efforts to educate the produce industry and state regulatory partners on the new produce safety requirements, and will continue its focus on training, guidance development, and outreach over the next year.”  As a result, Commissioner Gottlieb asserted the FDA’s intention to: (1) extend agricultural water compliance dates; (2) engage stakeholders regarding agricultural water standards; (3) recognize other methods that are appropriate for use in agricultural water testing; (4) delay inspections to assess compliance with the non-water requirements of the Produce Safety Rule for produce other than sprouts; and (5) work in partnership with farmers and the states to provide training opportunities for producers and regulators.   

Food Safety: FDA Commissioner Issues Statement Regarding Crops Affected by Recent Hurricanes
On September 14, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb issued a statement regarding crops, particularly rice, affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.  Commissioner Gottlieb stated that “I want to make it clear that the FDA has not issued a ban on rice or any other food crops.”  According to the Commissioner, “[r]ice grown in normal conditions and rice that has not been exposed to contaminated floodwaters from the recent hurricanes may enter commerce.” Additionally, Commissioner Gottlieb stated that “rice and other crops that were harvested and stored safely before storms hit should not be considered impacted by these events.”

SNAP: Alaska Agrees to Pay Nearly $2.5 Million over Allegedly False SNAP Claims
On September 18, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that “[t]he Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (ADHSS) has agreed to pay the United States $2,489,999 to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act in its administration of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.” According to the DOJ, beginning in 2009, ADHSS contracted with an outside consultant who “injected bias into ADHSS’s quality control process and resulted in ADHSS submitting inaccurate quality control data and information to USDA.” The DOJ alleged that due to the inaccurate submissions, ADHSS received “performance bonuses for fiscal years 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013, that it should not have received.”

GMOs: European Court Finds Italy’s GMO ban unlawful
On September 13, 2017, Reuters reported that the European Court of Justice has determined that Italy wrongfully banned the cultivation of the genetically modified (GMO) maize MON 810.  Though previously approved by the European Union in 1998, Italy nonetheless decided to ban MON 810 after two Italian studies questioned the products safety.  According to the European Court of Justice, however, “unless there is significant evidence that GMOs are a serious risk to human or animal health or the environment, then member states cannot adopt emergency measures to prohibit their use.”

Food Safety: USDA Requires HACCP Reviews in Hurricane Affected Areas
On September 19, 2017, the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued notice that establishments affected by recent hurricanes must reassess their Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point plans and take appropriate actions.  The notice stated that “[r]eview of FSIS data and published research indicates the potential for an increase in Salmonella incidence in regulated food products following flood events.” According to the notice, inspection program personnel must also “verify whether the establishment’s Sanitation SOPs and any cleaning and related monitoring are adequate to address any additional sanitation problems related to the hurricanes.”

FSMA: FDA Offers Training for Carriers covered by the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food Rule
On September 20, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that the “FDA is offering a one-hour training module, free of charge, to help carriers meet the requirements of FDA’s Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food Rule.” According to the FDA, under the Sanitary Transportation Rule, covered rail and motor vehicle carriers must “provide food safety training to their personnel engaged in transportation operations.” The FDA stated that while the offered “course is designed to provide basic food safety training to transportation operations personnel…[it] does not describe specific operating procedures and practices.”  Instead the training is only “intended to complement industry best practices.”

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices
Milk Marketing Board


AgLaw HotLinks:


Listen to our new Agricultural Law Podcast by clicking here!

Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive AgLaw HotLinks

Connect with us on Facebook! Every week we will post the CASL Ledger which details all our publications and activities from the week.

Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.


For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.