Thursday, August 17, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—August 17, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney

The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

FSMA: FDA Releases Guidance on Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food Rule
On August 14, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the availability of guidance material entitled: Clarification on Food Establishment Waiver from Requirements of the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food Rule: Guidance for Industry.  According to FDA, “this guidance provides clarification on the scope of the waiver for food establishments that provide food directly to consumers from the requirements of the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food Rule (the food establishment waiver).”  FDA stated that the guidance is “in response to questions the Agency has received since publication of the final rule.”

Farmland Preservation: Pennsylvania Announces 33 Newly Preserved Farms
On August 11, 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) announced that the “Pennsylvania’s Agricultural Land Preservation Board [has] added 2,999 acres on 33 farms in 12 counties to the more than half a million acres and 5,100 Pennsylvania farms permanently preserved for agricultural production.”  According to PDA, the 33 newly persevered farms are located in Berks, Blair, Bucks, Centre, Chester, Lancaster, Lehigh, Northampton, Perry, Snyder, Union and York counties.  PDA stated that since the Pennsylvania Agricultural Conservation Easement Purchase Program “began in 1988, federal, state, county and local governments have invested nearly $1.4 billion to preserve 539,180 acres on 5,169 farms in 59 counties for future agricultural production.”

Livestock Mandatory Reporting/COOL: USDA Strengthens Enforcement Rules for Livestock Mandatory Reporting and COOL Programs
On August 8, 2017, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) announced that the agency has “issued a final rule allowing USDA to take action as needed, including levying civil penalties, against violators of the Livestock Mandatory Reporting (LMR) and the Country of Origin Labeling (COOL) regulations.” USDA-AMS stated that “[t]he action extends the current rules of practice under the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, as amended, to include LMR and COOL violations.” Accordingly, the new rules “allow up to $10,000 in fines per violation for violating the LMR regulations…[and] fines for a retailer or person engaged in the business of supplying a covered commodity that willfully violates COOL regulations.”

Antimicrobial: FDA Proposes New Method to Determine Antimicrobials in Food Animals
On August 15, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published notice in the Federal Register of the “availability for public comment of a proposed method for applying a food animal biomass denominator to annual data on antimicrobials sold and distributed for use in food animals in the United States” (82 FR 38695).  According to FDA, “[a]nimal drug sponsors are required to report annually to FDA the amount of antimicrobials sold or distributed for use in food-producing animals and provide species-specific estimates of the percentage of their drug product sales for use in any of the four major food-producing species (cattle, swine, chickens, and turkeys) identified on the approved product label.” FDA is proposing a “method for using a biomass denominator to adjust these sales data.” FDA stated that “[t]he proposed method will provide estimates of annual antimicrobial drug sales adjusted for the size of the animal population (the animal biomass of each such species) potentially being treated with those drugs.”

Dairy: FDA Announces Guidance for Ultrafiltered Milk  
On August 14, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published notice in the Federal Register of the availability of a guidance for industry entitled: Ultrafiltered Milk in the Production of Standardized Cheeses and Related Cheese Products: Guidance for Industry (82 FR 37815).  According to FDA, “[t]he guidance advises manufacturers who wish to use ultrafiltered milk (UF milk) or ultrafiltered nonfat milk (UF nonfat milk) in the production of standardized cheeses and related cheese products that, pending completion of a rulemaking regarding the use of UF milk in the production of these products, [FDA] intend[s] to exercise enforcement discretion regarding the use of fluid UF milk and fluid UF nonfat milk in the production of standardized cheeses and related cheese products." Additionally, FDA stated that the agency “also intend[s] to exercise enforcement discretion regarding the declaration of ingredients in the labeling of standardized cheeses and related cheese products when fluid UF milk and fluid UF nonfat milk are used as ingredients.”

Animal Welfare: Pennsylvania Captive Deer Herd Tests Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease
On August 11, 2017, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) “announced that 27 deer from a Bedford County deer farm have tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease.”  According to PDA, “[t]o prevent further spread of the disease, officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Veterinary Services, USDA Wildlife Services and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture depopulated, or euthanized, the herd [of 215 deer] on June 20, 2017.” Subsequently, “[t]he National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa conducted the testing and reported results to the department and USDA on August 7, 2017.”  PDA stated that “[a]ccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no strong evidence that humans or livestock can contract Chronic Wasting Disease.”

Pennsylvania Legislation
Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee (Senate)


Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee (House)


Pennsylvania Actions and Notices
Department of Agriculture


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For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—August 10, 2017

Written by M. Sean High—Staff Attorney

The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Pesticides: Monsanto Announces Steps to Combat Dicamba Issues
On August 2, 2017, Monsanto issued an “open letter” to farmers experiencing issues with the company’s recently developed dicamba formulation known as XtendiMax® with VaporGrip® Technology.  According to the announcement, Monsanto has received “reports that some farmers are noticing signs of leaf cupping in nearby soybean fields, which could be attributable to dicamba.” As a result, Monsanto announced that the company: 1) has requested that affected farmers report symptoms to Monsanto and arrange a time for a field inspection; 2) has deployed scientist to analyze how weather patterns may have affected application for the 2017 season; and 3) will provide expanded outreach, education and training efforts for the 2018 season.

FSMA: FDA Releases Guidance Material Explaining Certain FSMA Exemptions
On August 7, 2017, the FDA announced the publication of three guidance documents designed to assist producers of Low-acid Canned Foods (LACF), juice Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP), or seafood HACCP understand exemptions from the FDA’s Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA).  According to the FDA, regulations were previously established that are “specific to seafood, juice, and LACF and [that] some exemptions have been made in the FSMA rules for these products.” Nevertheless, the FDA stated that “there are still some requirements in the FSMA regulations that apply to processors of the seafood, juice, and LACF products.” The FDA asserted that the guidance documents are intended “to help industry identify these exemptions and understand the juice, seafood, and LACF regulations in connection with some of the new FSMA requirements.”

Biosecurity: APHIS Designates Seven Regions as Being of Negligible Risk for BSE
On August 8, 2017, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) published notice in the Federal Register that the agency was concurring with “the World Organization for Animal Health's (OIE) bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) risk designations for seven regions” (82 FR 37041).  APHIS stated that the OIE now “recognizes these regions as being of negligible risk for BSE.” Accordingly, the seven regions designated by APHIS as being of negligible risk for BSE are Costa Rica, Germany, Lithuania, Mexico, Namibia, Romania, and Spain.

Farmers’ Markets: USDA Announces National Farmers Market Week
On August 3, 2017, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued a proclamation that the week of August 6-12, 2017, is to be National Farmers Market Week.  According to the proclamation, the USDA “recognizes the importance of expanding agricultural marketing opportunities that assist and encourage the next generation of farmers and ranchers…generate farm income…[and] build community connections through urban and rural linkages.” As a result, Secretary Perdue called for “the American people to celebrate farmers markets with appropriate observances and activities.”

Labeling: FSIS Extends Deadline to Complete Labeling Claim Questionnaire  
On August 7, 2017, the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced an extension to the date that inspection program personnel in establishments that produce raw ground beef products, raw chicken parts, and ready-to-eat products must complete the label claims questionnaire announced in FSIS Notice 21-17.  Accordingly, the new deadline for completing the questionnaire is August 30, 2017.

Beginning Farming: USDA Announces Agreement for SCORE Mentorship
On August 5, 2017, the USDA announced that Secretary Sonny Perdue “signed a Memorandum of Understanding with officials from SCORE, the nation’s largest volunteer network of expert business mentors, to support new and beginning farmers.” Accordingly to USDA, “SCORE matches business professionals and entrepreneurs with new business owners to mentor them through the process of starting-up and maintaining a new business.” USDA stated that through the new agreement, “SCORE mentors will partner with USDA and a wide array of groups already hard at work serving new and beginning farmers and ranchers, such as the FFA, 4-H, cooperative extension and land grant universities, nonprofits, legal aid groups, banks, technical and farm advisors.”

Pennsylvania Legislation
Agricultural and Rural Affairs Committee (House)
  •  Informational meeting on Chesapeake Bay Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) and any other business that may come before the committee (Wednesday, August 16, 2017)


Pennsylvania Actions and Notices
Game Commission 


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Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.


For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Agricultural Law Weekly Review – August 3, 2017

Written by Joseph Mooradian and Deanna Smith – Research Assistants

Animal Welfare: House Appropriations Committee Approves Transportation Regulations Impacting Livestock

On July 17, 2017, the House Appropriations Committee approved language permanently extending exemptions to regulations which impact the transport of livestock. Previously, regulations enacted in 49 U.S.C. 31137 required that certain types of commercial transport vehicles, including those transporting livestock, have a device installed which would track the vehicle’s hours of operation. This electronic logging device (ELD) worked to keep drivers in compliance with hours of service (HOS) requirements enforced by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). The appropriations subcommittee’s report on the appropriations bill stated that these regulations are, “problematic for livestock which can become overheated and may sometimes die without the air flow provided by the motion of the truck,” and “encourages” the FMCSA to take a more varied approach to livestock transporter’s exemption requests to HOS requirements. As such, Section 132 of the bill restricts FMCSA funding from going towards enforcement of the ELD requirements.

Crop Insurance: Beekeeper Insurance to be Expanded to the 48 Contiguous States

On July 27, 2017, the USDA issued a press release stating that crop insurance provided by the USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) would now cover all 48 contiguous states. This announcement expands the Apiculture Pilot Insurance (API) plan, “ensuring greater protection for the producers’ honey, pollen collection, wax, and breeding stock.” Interested producers have until November 15, 2017 to enroll with an RMA crop insurance agent for the 2018 crop year.

WOTUS: EPA Begins Formal Process to Change WOTUS Definition

On July 27, 2017, the EPA issued a proposed rule aimed at revising the definition of the “waters of the United States” (WOTUS), in order to alter the administration of the Clean Water Act (33 CFR Part 328). This proposed rule comes in response to President Trump’s Executive order from February 28, 2017, which called for a revision to the current definition of WOTUS in accordance with a stay on the definition ordered by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court. This proposed rule seeks to return to a definition from before the 2015 Clean Water Rule, in an attempt to, “provide continuity and certainty for regulated entities, the States, agency staff, and the public.”

Biofuels: Court Rules Against EPA Reductions in Renewable Fuel Volumes

On July 28, 2017, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) decision to reduce the total renewable fuel volume requirements for 2016. Americans for Clean Energy, among other groups, brought suit over the reduced biofuel requirement, and the Circuit Court held that the EPA must review its rule, stating that the, “EPA erred in how it interpreted the ‘inadequate domestic supply’ waiver provision,” as outlined in the Renewable Fuel Standard Program. Accordingly, the EPA’s recently announced biofuel decreases for 2018 have been removed from its website.

Pesticides: Monsanto Appeals California Listing Glyphosate as Carcinogenic

On July 21, 2017, Monsanto filed an appeal of the dismissal of its suit contending California’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment’s (OEHHA) classification of Monsanto’s pesticide glyphosate as a “probable human carcinogen,” according to Food Chemical News. FCN reported that Monsanto’s lawsuit originated in January 2016, when the chemical was originally designated a probable carcinogen under California’s Proposition 65, through which the state identifies substances it believes to be carcinogenic and notifies the public. The lawsuit was dismissed this past March, which Monsanto is now appealing in California’s 5th District Court of Appeal.

Antitrust: Tyson Price-Fixing Lawsuit Dismissed

On July 26, 2017, a lawsuit against Tyson Foods alleging that Tyson had conspired to fix prices was dismissed by the Federal District Court for the Western District of Arkansas. The lawsuit started as four separate complaints, but was eventually consolidated into a single case alleging that, “Tyson engaged in an industry-wide antitrust conspiracy aimed at depressing the domestic supply of broiler chickens, thus keeping prices and margins high.” The opinion, available through the Public Access to Court Electronic Records website, (Case 5:16-cv-05362-TLB) stated that “the Complaint fails to plausibly allege that Tyson entered into an agreement with its industry competitors to suppress the domestic supply of chicken, in order to increase prices.”


Pennsylvania Legislation

Agriculture and Rural Affairs [House]

  • HB1689: An Act amending the act of June 30, 1981 (P.L.128, No.43), known as the Agricultural Area Security Law, further providing for purchase of agricultural conservation easements, for Agricultural Conservation Easement Purchase Fund and for Land Trust Reimbursement Program. (Referred to Agriculture and Rural Affairs, July 27, 2017)



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Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.

For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.


Thursday, July 27, 2017

Agriculture Law Weekly Review – July 27, 2017

Written by Joseph Mooradian and Deanna Smith – Research Assistants


Agricultural Labor: House Appropriations Approves Amendment Expanding H-2A Access

On July 18, 2017, the House Appropriations Committee approved an amendment which would permit H-2A workers to work for more types of agricultural businesses than previously allowed. The language of the amendment states that H-2A workers can, “perform agricultural labor services, without regard to whether such labor is, or services are, of a temporary or seasonal nature.” The amendment would not change how long workers will remain in the country, but provide them the potential to work for other types of businesses, “such as dairies and agriculture operations with multiple crops and harvests.”

Pesticides: Class Action Lawsuit Claims Monsanto Encouraged Farmers to Use Illegal Pesticides

On July 19, 2017, a class action lawsuit was brought against Monsanto alleging crop damage due to dicamba drift. The complaint contended that Monsanto released its pesticide to farmers with compatible crops before these products were approved by the EPA while publicly telling all farmers that they should not use the pesticide. In spite of its public actions, however, the complaint stated that Monsanto was covertly telling farmers the opposite, and that using the unapproved pesticide would be “be just fine.” According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Monsanto stated in a response that they, “remain confident in growers’ ability to follow all application requirements and abide by the law.”

Water Law: EPA Sued Over Approval of Ohio’s Lake Erie Plan

On July 18, 2017, the Environmental Law & Policy Center issued a press release describing the complaint the organization filed against the EPA. The press release stated that, “the open waters of Lake Erie should be designated impaired under the Clean Water Act because harmful algal blooms that form there most years are preventing those waters from meeting basic state water quality standards.” According to the press release, the EPA approved the state’s Ohio EPA’s recognition that, “algal bloom problems are impairing Lake Erie’s shoreline and areas which are used as a source of public drinking water.” The press release asserted that this determination does not go far enough, and that, “the agency refused to address the algal blooms’ effects on the full extent of the lake’s waters even though it’s a single water body.” The press release stated that, “[t]he algal blooms are caused by phosphorus pollution that primarily comes from manure and fertilizer running off of agricultural land.”

Food Safety: Contaminated Feed Behind European BSE Cases

On July 13, 2017, the European Food Safety Authority journal published a scientific opinion alleging that the most likely source of isolated cases of BSE is contaminated feed. According to the opinion, BSE is a difficult disease to source, “due to a time span of several years between the potential exposure of the animal and the confirmation of disease, recall difficulty, and the general paucity of documented objective evidence available in the farms at the time of the investigation.” The publication, however, stated that contaminated feed is the most likely source of the infection, “when compared with other biologically plausible sources of infection (maternal, environmental, genetic, iatrogenic).”

GMO Labeling: USDA Extends Comment Period, Lists Labeling as “Inactive” in Latest Unified Agenda

On July 20, 2017, the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) extended the request for comment period on the. Bioengineered Food Disclosure Rule from July 17 to August 25. The AMS stated that their purpose for doing so was, “to allow more time for stakeholders to provide feedback on the range of topics covered by the 30 questions.” On the same day, the rule was shifted to the “inactive actions” list under the latest Unified Agenda, the first for the Trump Administration.


Pennsylvania Legislation
Agriculture and Rural Affairs
  • HB1494: An Act amending the act of June 28, 1995 (P.L.89, No.18), known as the Conservation and Natural Resources Act, in Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, further providing for contracts and agreements. (Approved by the Governor, July 20, 2017 – Act No. 25)
  • HB1671: An Act amending Title 3 (Agriculture) of the Pennsylvania Consolidated Statutes, in weights and measures, further providing for definitions, for office and working standards and equipment, for specific powers and duties of department and regulations, for testing and inspections of standards, for general testing and inspections, for registration and report of inspection and testing of weighing and measuring devices used for commercial purposes, for police powers, right of entry and stoppage, for powers and duties of director and inspector, for city and county sealers and deputy sealers of weights and measures, appointment and powers and duties, for method of sale of commodities, for butter, oleomargarine and margarine, for fluid dairy products, for flour, cornmeal and hominy grits, for licenses, for weighmasters' certificates, for preparation of weighmaster's certificate, for scale requirement, for disposition of copies of certificates, for suspension of revocation of licenses, for sales by weight, for meter required, for investigations and for disposition of funds, providing for interim procedures and establishing the Weights and Measures Restricted Account. (Referred to Agricultural and Rural Affairs July 21, 2017 [House])

Environmental Resources and Energy
  • SB144: An Act amending the act of January 24, 1966 (1965 P.L.1535, No.537), known as the Pennsylvania Sewage Facilities Act, further providing for official plans. (Approved by the Governor, July 20, 2017 – Act No. 26)
  • SB624: An Act amending the act of April 27, 1966 (1st Sp.Sess., P.L.31, No.1), known as The Bituminous Mine Subsidence and Land Conservation Act, providing for planned subsidence and for retroactivity. (Became Law without Governor's signature, July 22, 2017, Act No. 32)

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Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.

For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Agriculture Law Weekly Review – July 20, 2017

Written by Deanna Smith and Joseph Mooradian – Research Assistants
Antibiotics: Pew Report Provides Information on Alternatives to Animal Antibiotics
On July 10, 2017, The Pew Charitable Trusts published a report entitled Alternatives to Antibiotics in Animal Agriculture, which details ways to “maintain healthy herds and reduce the need for antibiotics.” Since the use of antibiotics has been limited by FDA Guidance 213, the industry will need to find alternative routes to promote healthy herds, a goal the Pew report aims to assist with. Pew’s solutions are wide ranging, including probiotics, antimicrobial peptides, and vaccines, among others. The report also highlights the ways that these alternatives interact, providing information enabling the optimization of animal health-care in the wake of reduced antibiotic use.


National Organic Program: Nature Valley “100% Natural” Lawsuit Dismissed
On July 12, 2017, the U.S. District Court for Minnesota granted a motion to dismiss in a lawsuit brought against General Mills, specifically concerning the company’s Nature Valley brand oat-based food products. The claim concerned the various foods’ “100% Natural” label, with the complaint arguing that, “this claim is misleading, false, and deceptive because Nature Valley Products contain trace amounts of the chemical glyphosate[.]” The Court dismissed the claim on the basis that the plaintiffs failed to state an adequate claim, concluding that the plaintiffs had too broadly construed the “100% Natural” labeling. The Court also stated that, “It would be nearly impossible to produce a processed food with no trace of any synthetic molecule.”


Animal Welfare: House Appropriations Committee Votes on Horse Slaughter Ban
On July 12, 2017, the United States House Committee on Appropriations approved the 2018 Agriculture Appropriations Bill which did not include a ban on using federal funds for horse meat inspections. Earlier that day, the Committee voted to not reinstate the ban on federally funded horse slaughtering in the U.S.. Generally, federal funds are necessary for the running of horse slaughtering facilities because USDA employees must inspect the horses meant for human consumption. This is the second time since the original ban on federally funded horse slaughtering that the Appropriations Committee has left the ban out of the Agriculture Appropriations Bill. The first time was in 2011, the same year the General Accountability Office (GAO) released a report titled, “Action Needed to Address Unintended Consequences from Cessation of Domestic Slaughter.” To read more about the history of horse slaughter legislation in the U.S., see this article in The New Food economy.


Industrial Hemp: New York Revises Industrial Hemp Law
On July 12, 2017, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed Assembly Bill 8509, which modifies the state’s industrial hemp law. The new bill defines industrial hemp as an agricultural product, establishes an industrial hemp seed certification program, and requires state agencies to collaborate on additional funding for research advancement. During the bill signing, Governor Cuomo remarked that, as a state, New York could find success in the industrial hemp market, and their goal is “to be the nation’s leader in hemp productions.”


National Ag Policy: USDA Releases its Emerging Animal Disease Preparedness Response Plan
On July 14, 2017, the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) released its Emerging Animal Disease Preparedness Response Plan. The plan, “outlines a strategy to detect and respond to emerging animal diseases and define the processes that APHIS will use to identify, evaluate, and respond to emerging diseases in animal populations.” The plan has been in the works since July of 2014. APHIS’s plan is a response to the rise in animal diseases over the last several decades, including of such diseases as, “porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, infectious salmon anemia, West Nile virus, and more recently porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.” Of note, APHIS says the document is not intended to remain in its current form in perpetuity, but rather that the plan is a, “living document, which may be updated as infrastructure or policies change.”


Animal Welfare: Perdue Farms Announces Animal Care Improvements
On July 17, 2017, "Perdue Farms announced animal care improvements that have elevated the welfare of its chickens.” This announcement came at the Perdue Farms’ Animal Care Summit, “a gathering of global animal care experts, advocates, researchers, and farmers,” where the company promised to meet criteria outlined in the “Joint Animal Protection Organization Statement on Broiler Chicken Welfare Issues.” The objectives will be incorporated into their own Commitments to Animal Care program, where some of the welfare issues were already being addressed. Some of the new animal welfare practices include giving the chickens more space, exposing them to more light during the day and less light at night, adding windows to chicken houses, moving to controlled atmosphere stunning (CAS), and raising slower growing chickens. To read more about Perdue’s animal welfare updates, see this Meat+Poultry article.


Pesticides: Court Allows Continued Use of Chlorpyrifos

On July 18, 2017 the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit denied a motion challenging the EPA’s continued use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos. The motion was a challenge brought by the Pesticide Action Network North America and Natural Resources Defense Council (PANNA) and alleged that the EPA’s decision not to ban chlorpyrifos was inadequate. The court held that the motion was “premature” and that any objections to the EPA’s decision “must first be made through the administrative process mandated by statute.” This recent legislation is another chapter to the longer story between the EPA and PANNA. As discussed in the motion, PANNA filed an administrative petition with the EPA in 2007 asking them to ban the use of chlorpyrifos. Frustrated with a lack of response, in 2014 PANNA petitioned the court for an answer to their administrative petition which they were granted. In March of this year, the EPA responded by denying the petition, which is the reason for the current bout in court.


Pennsylvania Legislation


Agriculture and Rural Affairs (Senate)
  • SB792: An Act amending Title 3 (Agriculture) of the Pennsylvania Consolidated Statutes, repealing provisions relating to fertilizer; providing for fertilizer; in soil and plant amendment, further providing for disposition of funds; and, in seed, further providing for disposition of funds. (Re-referred to Appropriations, July 17, 2017)

Environmental Resources and Energy (Senate)
  • SB168: A Resolution directing the Joint State Government Commission to establish an advisory committee to conduct a thorough and comprehensive analysis of the potential impact of removing Cambria County from the emissions testing program and report findings and recommendations to the Senate. (Referred to Environmental Resources and Energy, July 14, 2017)


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Connect with us on Facebook! Every week we will post the CASL Ledger which details all our publications and activities from the week.
Stay informed with our monthly Agricultural Law Brief located here.
For a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food, visit The Ag & Food Law Blog.