Thursday, July 11, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—July 11, 2019


Written by: M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Farmland Preservation: PA Governor Approves Agricultural Conservation Easement Legislation
On July 1, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf approved legislation amending the Commonwealth’s Agricultural Area Security Law (AASL) to allow landowners to voluntarily surrender the right to construct an additional residence on land subject to a conservation easement (HB 370).  Previously, AASL stated that a conservation easement “shall not prevent…[c]onstruction and use of structures on the subject land for the landowner's principal residence or for the purpose of providing necessary housing for seasonal or full-time employees: Provided, That only one such structure may be constructed on no more than two acres of the subject land during the term of the agricultural conservation easement.”  (3 Pa.C.S.A. § 14.1(c)(6)(iv)).  Under the new legislation, now known as Act 33, owners of the land subject to an agricultural conservation easement may now voluntarily “relinquish and extinguish” this right to construct an additional residence.  According to the sponsor of the legislation—Rep. Kate A. Klunk—this will allow landowners who do not wish to construct an additional residence the ability to reduce the value of their property for tax purposes.  Additionally, if a landowner does not relinquish the right to construct an additional residence, Act 33 now permits the construction to be used for an immediate family member as well as for the landowner or an employee.

Taxation: PA Governor Approves Tax Credit to Support Beginning Farmers
On July 2, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf approved legislation providing a tax credit for those who sell or rent their “agricultural assets” to beginning farmers (SB 478).  Now known as Act 65, the legislation defines an “agricultural asset” as “agricultural land, livestock, facilities, buildings and machinery used for farming.”  Qualifying agriculture asset owners include individuals, trusts, or pass-through entities.  Equipment and cattle dealers, however, do not qualify.  Under Act 65, qualifying owners of agricultural assets that rent or sell those assets to beginning farmers may apply to the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development for a tax credit against the tax due for the rental or sale of the asset.  For a sale of an agricultural asset, qualifying owners may receive a tax credit that is equal to 5% of the sale price or fair market value of the agricultural asset.  The tax credit, however, may not exceed $32,000.  For the lease of an agricultural asset, qualifying owners may receive a tax credit that is equal to 10% of the gross rent for the first, second, and third years of the lease.  The tax credit, however, may not exceed $7,000 per year.

Dairy Policy: PA Governor Approves Dairy Future Commission
On July 2, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf approved legislation establishing the Pennsylvania Dairy Future Commission (SB 585).  Now known as Act 66, the legislation creates a 22-member commission—consisting of representatives from both public and private sectors—charged with providing “recommendations to promote and strengthen the Commonwealth’s dairy industry.”  The purpose of the commission is to evaluate various factors affecting the dairy industry such as production, marketing, and regulations.  The commission will also have the ability to make recommendations regarding any legislative and/or regulatory changes that could benefit Pennsylvania’s dairy industry.   

Transportation: PA Governor Vetoes Travel Ban Exemption for Milk Haulers
On July 2, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf vetoed legislation that would have permitted milk haulers the ability to travel on Pennsylvania highways during a declaration of disaster emergency (HB 915).  Under current law, Pennsylvania’s governor has the authority to place travel restrictions on commercial vehicles during inclement weather.  According to the sponsor of the proposed legislation—Rep. Martin T. Causer—these restrictions do not consider the perishable nature of milk and that cows continue to produce milk while the travel restrictions are in place.  Rep. Causer’s proposed legislation provided that during a declaration of disaster emergency, a licensed milk hauler would have been permitted to travel to a dairy farm to pick-up milk and to transport milk to or from a milk plant.  In vetoing the legislation, Governor Wolf stated that “[p]roviding for an exemption to the travel ban under the declaration puts the public in jeopardy, which, in turn, endangers our State Police and first responders and even our milk haulers.”

Food Labeling: Canada Proposes New Food Labeling Regulations
On July 2, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Foreign Agriculture Service (FSA) announced that the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has issued proposed changes to the nation’s food labeling regulations.  FSA stated that the proposed labeling changes include how the terms “expiration date” and “best before date” may be used, a required listing of a manufacturer’s contact information, and a consistent location regarding a product’s country of origin declaration.  Interested stakeholders have until September 4, 2019, to submit comments to CFIA regarding the proposed changes.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Oh, SNAP! The Supreme Court Holds Store Level SNAP Redemption Data is Confidential Under FOIA Exemption 4”, Stewart D. Fried, Ag/FDA Blog – Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC (June 25, 2019)
“As the lease termination date approaches farm landowners have options”, Sarah Everhart, Maryland Risk Management Education Blog (June 18, 2019)
 
Federal Actions and Notices:
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Farm Service Agency

Federal Crop Insurance Corporation

Food and Nutrition Service

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 798: Legislation to amend the Commonwealth’s dog law regarding dangerous dogs (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, July 9, 2019)
HB 1687: Legislation to amend the Commonwealth’s fireworks law (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, July 8, 2019)
HB 1699: Legislation to permit therapy dogs on public transportation (Referred to House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, July 8, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Agriculture

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:


Thursday, July 4, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—July 4, 2019


Written by:
M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
Audry Thompson—Research Assistant
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Agricultural Policy: Seven Pennsylvania Agricultural Bills Become Law
On July 1, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf approved seven different agricultural bills into law. 

First, HB 1514 revised and re-established the existing Healthy Farms Healthy Schools program into the PA Farm-to-School Program.  Now known as Act 34, the legislation seeks to educate students in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade about agriculture and “the importance of choosing healthy, locally produced foods.”

Second, HB 1516 created the Pennsylvania Rapid Response Disaster Readiness Account.  Now known as Act 35, the legislation seeks to provide emergency funds to enable the PA Department of Agriculture to quickly respond to diseases or illnesses that threaten the Commonwealth’s agriculture sector.

Third, HB 1520 amended the PA Preferred Program to encourage military veteran participation in the Homegrown by Heroes Program.  Now known as Act 36, the legislation also created a grant program to incentivize access to meat processing inspections. 

Fourth, HB 1526 revised and re-established the Agriculture-Linked Investment Program.  Now known as Act 37, the legislation is designed to incentivize agricultural best management practices—regarding soil erosion, nutrient-runoff, and odor—through low interest loans.

Fifth, HB 1590 created the Dairy Investment Program.  Now known as Act 38, the legislation provides grants to projects that support the dairy industry.  Eligible projects involve research and development, organic transitioning, and value-added processing.  

Sixth, SB 634 created the Conservation Excellence Grant Program.  Now known as Act 39, the legislation seeks to furnish “technical and financial assistance for the implementation of best management practice project on agricultural operations in high-priority locations.”  Awards will be issued to successful applicants through grants, loans, or tax credits.

Seventh, SB 661 created the Agricultural Business Development Center to serve as a business resource and reference center for agricultural producers.  Now known as Act 40, the legislation also created the Commonwealth Specialty Crop Block Grant Program to “assist [in] the growth, certification of seed and marketing of high-priority specialty crops.”  Additionally, the legislation created the Agriculture and Youth Program to promote agriculture through programs such as FFA, 4-H, and Ag in the Classroom.  Finally, Act 40 created the Urban Agricultural Infrastructure Grant Program designed to promote urban agriculture through the awarding of financial grants.

Transportation: PA Governor Approves Legislation Expanding Width Allowance for Farm Machinery and Equipment on State Roads
On June 28, 2019, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf approved legislation expanding the permitted width allowance for certain farm machinery and equipment on Pennsylvania’s roads from 16 feet to 18 feet (SB 338).  The legislation applies to farm machinery and equipment defined under the Pennsylvania Vehicle Code as “implements of husbandry” (67 Chapter11).  Accordingly, the change in width allowance applies to “field equipment,” “tractors and wagons,” “trailers…designed to haul and apply fertilizer and insecticide on farmland,” and “agricultural equipment” such as “grain grinders and corn shellers.”  The legislation applies only to “implements of husbandry” and does not apply to “farm vehicles” such as tanker or cattle trucks (see PA Department of Motor Vehicles: Farm Vehicles).

Industrial Hemp/Cannabis: New York City Issues Embargo on Products Containing CBD
On July 1, 2019, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (Department) announced an embargo on products that contain cannabidiol (CBD).  According to the announcement, any products containing CBD “will have to be returned to the supplier or discarded,” and the Department will begin issuing violations to “food service establishments and retailers offering food or drink containing CBD” beginning October 1, 2019.  The embargo comes in response to a statement from the FDA in December 2018 affirming that the addition of CBD to food or drink is unlawful. 

Animal Welfare: USDA Issues Proposed Swine Garbage Feeding Rule
On June 20, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) posted notice in the Federal Register of a proposed rule amending the swine garbage feeding and enforcement responsibility provisions of the Swine Health Protection Act (SHPA).  SHPA is intended to ensure that food waste fed to swine is properly treated to kill disease organisms.  The proposed change seeks to move the status lists of States that are subject to each provision from the Code of Federal Regulations to the APHIS website.  The comment period for the proposed amendment is currently open and closes August 19, 2019. 

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Beer and Corn Syrup: Deception or Consumer Preference?”, Brianna J. Schroeder, Schroeder Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (June 25, 2019)
“IRS Issues Long-Awaited Proposed 199A Regulations for Cooperatives and Their Patrons”, Kristine A. Tidgren, The Ag Docket – Iowa State University Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation (June 18, 2019) 
  
Federal Actions and Notices:
Agriculture Department

Agricultural Marketing Service

Land Management Bureau

Pennsylvania Legislation:
SB 585: Legislation establishing the Pennsylvania Dairy Future Commission (Signed in House, June 26, 2019; signed in Senate, June 26, 2019; presented to Governor, June 27, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Game Commission

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—June 27, 2019


Written by:
M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
Audry Thompson—Research Assistant
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Food Policy: SCOTUS Rules USDA Does Not Need to Disclose Certain SNAP Information Under FOIA
On June 24, 2019, the U.S. Supreme Court held that under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) does not need to disclose certain private commercial or financial information from retail stores that participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) (Food Marketing Institute v. Argus Leader Media, Docket No. 18-481).  Previously, Argus Leader Media filed a FOIA request seeking the names and addresses of all retail stores that participated in SNAP for fiscal years 2005 through 2010.  Additionally, Argus Leader Media sought each retail store’s annual SNAP redemption data for fiscal years 2005 through 2010.  USDA declined to disclose the store-level SNAP data, claiming the information was exempted from disclosure under FOIA.  According to the Court, “[a]t least where commercial or financial information is both customarily and actually treated as private by its owner and provided to the government under an assurance of privacy, the information is ‘confidential’” and exempt from FOIA disclosure.

Right to Farm Laws: Lawsuit Challenges North Carolina Farm Nuisance Protections
On June 19, 2019, several non-profit environmental organizations filed a complaint in North Carolina state court alleging the unconstitutionality of two state statutes designed to protect farms from nuisance lawsuits (Rural Empowerment Assoc. for Community Health v. North Carolina, 19-CV-008198).  The complaint alleged that the statutes (S.B. 711 and H.B. 467) disproportionately affect “low-wealth and non-white communities,” and were “introduced to protect Smithfield from pending nuisance suits,” thus violating Article II, Section 24 of the North Carolina Constitution, which prohibits “‘local, private, or special’ laws ‘[r]elating to health sanitation, and the abatement of nuisances.’” Both pieces of legislation were enacted after the state’s legislators overrode vetoes by North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper.

Crop Insurance: USDA Moves Cover Crop Harvest Date to September 1st 
On June 20, 2019, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) announced it has adjusted the 2019 date for cover crop haying and grazing on prevented plant acres from November 1 to September 1.  Under the flood provisions for Prevented Planting Insurance, producers who are prevented from planting their regularly insured crop due to floods, hurricanes, or excess precipitation have the option to plant a cover crop during the late planting period and receive an insurance payment.  These producers, however, may not normally hay, graze, or cut that crop for silage until November 1; thereby delaying their use of the crop.  Due to excessive rain and flooding in the spring of 2019, RMA stated that it will permit producers to “hay, graze or cut cover crops for silage, haylage or baleage on prevented plant acres on or after September 1 and still maintain eligibility for their full 2019 prevented planting indemnity.” According to RMA, the adjustments are for 2019 only.

National Agricultural Policy: USDA Forms New Partnership to Promote U.S. Agriculture
On June 18, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced a formalized partnership with the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance to promote, and increase demand for, U.S. agricultural products.  Established through a Memorandum of Understanding the partnership is an outgrowth of the recent Honor the Harvest Forum.  According to USDA Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Greg Ibach, the partnership will serve to “enhance consumer confidence and drive demand for U.S. agricultural products, particularly among the 95 percent of consumers who live outside the United States.” The memorandum declares the parties’ intent to undertake “activities and programs, both jointly and separately” to:
  1. Promote U.S. agriculture and U.S. agricultural products.
  2. Build awareness of the importance of U.S. agriculture to the U.S. rural economy.
  3. Reinforce the relationship between what U.S. farmers produce and what U.S. consumers eat.
  4. Support awareness of U.S. agriculture's key role in an environmentally-sustainable food value chain.
  5. Drive demand for U.S. agricultural products in both domestic and overseas markets.

Invasive Species: USDA Revises Plant Pest Regulations
On June 25, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) posted notice in the Federal Register of a final rule revising the regulations regarding the movement of plant pests (84 FR 29938).  According to APHIS, the revisions remove obsolete requirements, provide a more efficient permitting process for low risk organisms, and update regulations regarding the import of foreign soil.  APHIS stated that the changes will allow the agency to better focus resources on "high-risk organisms."

Invasive Species: USDA Announces Feral Swine Control Pilot Program
On June 20, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced $75 million in funding to eradicate and control feral swine through the Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot Program.  In a joint effort between USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), NCRS will devote up to $33.75 million of the funds towards pilot projects in areas that have the highest feral swine population densities: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas.  Pilot projects will consist of three coordinated components: 1) feral swine removal by APHIS; 2) restoration efforts supported by NRCS; and 3) assistance to producers for feral swine control provided through partnership agreements with non-federal partners.  This year, NRCS will invest up to $1.5 million per project, which can last for one to three years, with awardees matching at least 25% of the partnership budget.  Applications for project grants must be submitted through grants.gov by Aug. 19, 2019.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Uncertainty in Agriculture”, John R. Block, Ag/FDA Blog – Olsson Frank Weeda Terman Matz PC (June 19, 2019)
“The Model Ag Data Use Agreement”, Todd Janzen, Janzen Ag Law Blog – Janzen Ag Law (June 12, 2019)   
  
Federal Actions and Notices:
Agricultural Marketing Service

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Environmental Protection Agency

Food and Drug Administration

Labor Department

Pennsylvania Legislation:
HB 1514: Legislation to revise and re-establish the existing Healthy Farms Healthy Schools program into the PA Farm-to-School Program (Referred to Senate for consideration, June 24, 2019)
HB 1516: Legislation to create the Pennsylvania Rapid Response Disaster Readiness Account (Referred to Senate for consideration, June 24, 2019)
HB 1590: Legislation to create the Dairy Investment Program (Referred to Senate for consideration, June 24, 2019)
HB 1517: Legislation to create the Conservation Excellence Program (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, June 20, 2019)
HB 1518: Legislation to revise and re-establish the former (expired) Agriculture and Rural Youth Development Program (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, June 20, 2019)
HB 1519: Legislation to establish a state-level Specialty Crop Block Grant Program (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, June 20, 2019)
HB 1520: Legislation to create a grant program to incentivize access to meat processing inspections (Referred to Senate for consideration, June 24, 2019)
HB 1521: Legislation to amend PA Preferred Program to encourage military veteran participation in the Homegrown by Heroes Program (Referred to Senate Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee, June 20, 2019)
HB 1523: Legislation to establish the Pennsylvania Agricultural Business Development Center (Referred to Senate for consideration, June 24, 2019)
HB 1526: Legislation to revise and re-establish the Agriculture-Linked Investment Program (Referred to Senate for consideration, June 24, 2019)
SB 585: Legislation establishing the Pennsylvania Dairy Future Commission (Referred to Senate Rules and Executive Nominations Committee, June 19, 2019)
SB 634: Legislation establishing the Conservation Excellence Grant Program (Referred to House for consideration, June 20, 2019)
SB 661: Legislation to create the Commonwealth Specialty Crop Block Grant Program (Referred to House for consideration, June 20, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Agriculture

Department of Environmental Protection

Milk Marketing Board

State Conservation Commission

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Agricultural Law Weekly Review—June 20, 2019


Written by:
M. Sean High—Staff Attorney
Audry Thompson—Research Assistant
           
The following information is an update of recent local, state, national, and international legal developments relevant to agriculture:

Air Quality: EPA Issues Final Rule Exempting Animal Waste Air Emissions from EPCRA Reporting
On June 13, 2019, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published notice in the Federal Register of a final rule amending the reporting regulations under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) (84 FR 27533).  Under the final rule, air emissions from animal waste at farms is specifically exempted from EPCRA reporting requirements.  Additionally, EPA stated that the final rule adds definitions to the terms “animal waste” and “farm” to the EPCRA regulations so as “to delineate the scope of this reporting exemption.”  The final rule will become effective July 15, 2019.

International Trade: EU to Increase Importation of U.S. Hormone-Free Beef
On June 14, 2019, the European Commission announced an agreement had been reached to increase the importation of U.S. hormone-free beef into the European Union (EU).  Enacted in 2009, and revised in 2014, the EU had placed a 45,000 tonne (metric ton) quota on the importation of non-hormone treated beef into the EU for all qualified suppliers.  Subsequently, the U.S. filed a dispute with the World Trade Organization (WTO).  Under the terms of the announced agreement, which settles the filed WTO dispute, the U.S. will be allocated 35,000 tonnes of the 45,000 tonne quota.  The new allotment will be phased in over a seven-year period.

Industrial Hemp/Cannabis: Tennessee Department of Agriculture Announces Hemp Rule Changes
On June 3, 2019, the Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA) announced new rule changes for Tennessee’s hemp program, enacted in 2014 through Public Chapter No. 916.  According to Agriculture Commissioner Charlie Hatcher, D.V.M., the revisions were devised in response to changes in “the hemp industry and federal laws,” referring to the removal of hemp from the list of federally controlled substances.  In accordance with Tennessee’s new rules,
  • Hemp processors are no longer required to register through TDA.
  • The hemp program will no longer issue licenses for certified seed breeders. Anyone manufacturing, distributing, or labeling seed should, however, be licensed through TDA’s Ag Inputs section.
  • Growers will still need movement permits when transporting rooted plants and are now required to be permitted when moving harvested hemp from their growing site.

Dairy Policy: U.S. Department of Agriculture Announces Dairy Margin Coverage Enrollment
On June 14, 2019, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced enrollment for the new Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program beginning June 17.  According to the announcement, the “new program offers protection to dairy producers when the difference between the all-milk price and the average feed cost (the margin) falls below a certain dollar amount selected by the producer.”  The DMC program was authorized in the 2018 Farm Bill to replace the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP).  The new program expands the offerings of coverage levels along with the covered percentage of production history.  Dairy producers who previously purchased coverage through the former MPP program may choose to receive a cash refund for 50 percent of their repayment amount or can elect to receive DMC credit for 75 percent of premiums previously paid to the MPP program.  The enrollment period ends September 20.  (For further reading: see “The Key Differences between the Margin Protection Program and Dairy Margin Coverage”, by Emily Wilmes, University of Minnesota Extension).

Organic Agriculture: USDA Clarifies Certification of Organic Container Systems
On June 3, 2019, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued a memo clarifying eligibility and compliance requirements regarding the organic certification of container systems.  According to USDA, container systems can include hydroponic and pot-based systems regardless of whether soil is the growing media.  Such container systems may be certified under the National Organic Program if they comply with the Organic Foods Production Act and the USDA organic regulations.  Under current regulations, “any field or farm parcel from which harvested crops are intended to be sold, labeled, or represented as ‘organic,’ must…. have had no prohibited substances…applied to it for a period of 3 years immediately preceding harvest of the crop” (7 CFR 205.202).  According to USDA, the “memo clarifies that the legal requirements related to the three-year transition period apply to all container systems built and maintained on land.” Accordingly, no prohibited substance may be applied in the system or on the ground underneath the system.

Food Policy: USDA Reopens Comment Period on Proposed SNAP Rule
On June 14, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) published notice in the Federal Register that the agency is reopening the comment period regarding proposed changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) regulations (84 FR 27743).  Previously, on April 5, 2019, FNS proposed changes regarding the eligibility of certain SNAP retail food stores with a comment period that closed on June 14, 2019 (84 FR 13555).  According to the agency, two supporting documents to the proposed rule—the Regulatory Impact Analysis and the Regulatory Flexibility Analysis—were inadvertently excluded from publication.  As a result, the two publications have been added to the docket for the proposed rule and the comment period has been reopened until June 20, 2019.

From National Ag Law Experts:
“Indiana Court of Appeals Upholds Constitutionality of Right to Farm Act”, Tiffany Dowell Lashmet, Texas Agriculture Law Blog – Texas A&M AgriLife Extension (June 10, 2019)
“2019 Brings Potential Changes to Hemp Production in Maryland”, Paul Goeringer, Maryland Risk Management Education Blog (June 11, 2019)
   
Federal Actions and Notices:
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Farm Service Agency

Food and Nutrition Service

Forest Service

Pennsylvania Legislation:
HR 222: Resolution urging U.S. Congress and U.S. FDA to enforce standard regarding term “milk” (Reported to House, June 18, 2019)
HR 402: Resolution to recognize vale of whole milk and support the serving of whole milk at schools (Reported to House, June 18, 2019)
HB 374: Legislation to create the Keystone Tree Fund (Referred to House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee, June 14, 2019)

Pennsylvania Actions and Notices:
Department of Agriculture

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture:

Penn State Research:

AgLaw HotLinks:

Stay Informed:
Listen to our weekly Agricultural Law Podcast
Read our monthly Agricultural Law Brief newsletter    
Follow us on Twitter at PSU Ag & Shale Law (@AgShaleLaw) to receive daily AgLaw HotLinks
Connect with us on Facebook to view our weekly CASL Ledger detailing Center publications and activities
Visit The Ag & Food Law Blog for a comprehensive summary of daily judicial, legislative, and regulatory developments in agriculture and food